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Port of Vancouver completes clean up of municipal waterways and shipping channels

The Vancouver Fraser Port Authority announced the completion of its Fraser River Improvement Initiative. This is a two million dollar, five-year program that started in 2013 to clean up municipal waterways and shipping channels from derelict boats and structures along the Fraser River. Work on over 150 identified sites took place, with the port contacting owners and, where possible, working with them to ensure safe removal of structures or boats.

R/V Petrel publishes photos of wrecked USS Wasp

The crew of Paul Allen’s research vessel, the R/V Petrel discovered the American wrecked aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV7), which was sank in 1942 after being fatally damaged by Japanese torpedoes. After several AUV dives Petrel found it in 14,000 feet of water, miles from the best estimate of its final position. 

Australia may have a new lead for the lost WWII Destroyer

The search for the Australian Navy’s sunken World War II destroyer HMAS Vampire is currently ongoing off the coast of Sri Lanka, as navies of both countries contribute hydrographic assets to find the ship. Research carried out by both Australian and Sri Lankan hydrographers found that there is a strong possibility that HMAS Vampire’s final resting place has been located.

Bill C-64 in protection of Canada’s marine environment launched

The Government of Canada via its ‘Ocean Protection Plan’ is acting to prevent its eco-marine environment from being affected as wrecked, abandoned, and hazardous vessels, including small boats, pose environmental, economic, and safety hazards, and are a concern for coastal and inland water communities across Canada via yesterday’s passage of Bill C-64: the Wrecked, Abandoned or Hazardous Vessels Act.

Guyana ratifies treaties for safe and clean shipping

Guyana ratified two key IMO measures aimed to preserve bio-diversity: the Ballast Water Management Convention and another on use of harmful anti-fouling systems on ships hulls. It also ratified others regarding unlawful acts against the safety of navigation and removing wrecks from the seabed. In addition, it signed four instruments covering liability and compensation.

The first Japanese battleship wreck from WWII found

Researchers from the organization started by philanthropist Paul Allen found the wreck of the first Japanese battleship sunk by the U.S. Navy during World War II. The 1914-built Hiei was a Japanese battlecruiser, one of the most heavily-armed vessels of its era, having eight 14-inch guns and armour up to nine inches thick. The vessel was crippled by a shell from the USS San Francisco on the 13th which disabled the steering gear. 

Canada set to assess risks related to ship wrecks

Canada has awarded a contract to Dartmouth-based London Offshore Consultants, for the development of a risk assessment methodology related to hundreds of vessels of concern (abandoned, wrecked or dilapidated vessels) in Canadian waters or on Crown land.

Greece hauls wrecked vessels from Gulf of Elefsina

Greece hauls the remains of cargo ships through the water, listing to one side with a rusting hull exposed  in and near the Gulf of Elefsina, an industrial area of shipyards and factories near Greece’s major port of Piraeus. Now Greek authorities have begun to remove the ships, some of which have been there for decades, saying they are both an environmental hazard and a danger to modern shipping.

IMO focuses on wreck removal challenges

A ship wreck can be a barrier to navigation. It is a possibility that other vessels and crew can face dangerous situations ,depending on the nature of the cargo and remaining fuel on board, a wreck may also cause damage to marine environments and other coastal interests.

Sunken Thai tour boat ‘Phoenix’ refloated

 On Saturday afternoon, Thai authorities managed to recover the wreck of the tourist boat ‘Phoenix’, which sank in July claiming lives of over 40 people onboard. The sunken vessel had been lying in 45 metres of water, about 4 km off Ko Hae, near Phuket, since 5 July, when it capsized in heavy weather. Previous attempts to refloat the sunken boat had been unsuccessful.

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