Ship Recycling

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Dangerous scrapping reported in Alang shipbreaking yard

A BBC Disclosure documentary investigation conducted by Mark Daly and Chris Foote journalists, revealed how shipbreaking activities in Alang, India caused severe harm to the environment. The disclosure pays attention to the illegally export attempt of a trio of floating rigs full of asbestos and mercury from the Scottish Cromarty Firth.

Maintaining and updating Part I of IHM during operations

Part I of the IHM shall remain with a vessel throughout its operational life, and be updated as all new installations enter the ship, as these may potentially contain hazards. The presence of the inventory will then ensure the safety of crew members during the vessel’s operational life.

Guidance on IHM survey and certification

Liberia Maritime Authority issued practical guidance to shipping on the development and maintenance of inventories of hazardous materials (IHM), in line with Regulation 5 of the Hong Kong Convention and Article 12 of the EU Ship Recycling Regulation (EU SRR). 

Bangladesh the favoured place for dismantling end-of-life ships

According to new data released by the NGO Shipbreaking Platform, 674 ocean-going commercial ships and offshore units were sold to the scrap yards in 2019. Of these vessels, 469 large tankers, bulkers, floating platforms, cargo and passenger ships were broken down on only three beaches in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan. This number amounts to approximately 90% of the gross tonnage dismantled worldwide.

Norway raids Teekay Offshore over suspicions of illegal waste export

Norway’s national economic crime unit (Okokrim) has raided the local office of Bermuda-based shipping company Teekay Offshore this week on suspicion of illegally exporting waste from the shuttle tanker Navion Britannia, the agency informed. The company denies any wrongdoing.

India passes new Act for safe ship recycling procedures

The Government of India informed that the “Recycling of Ships” Bill has become an Act, with the government setting specific international standards and implementing a statutory mechanism for enforcement of such standards.

EU Ship Recycling Regulation and IHM: How to comply

The entry into force of the sulphur cap in the beginning of 2020 is – and will be – the highlight of the year. However, at the end of 2020, ships must comply with another very important requirement. Specifically, starting from 31 December 2020, ships above 500 GT and flying the flag of an EU/EEA member state, or third-party flagged vessels calling at European ports, must carry an Inventory Hazardous Materials (IHM) certificate on board. To shed light on this matter, DNV GL hosted a webinar, providing more information about the subject.

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