Emissions

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Cruise industry still relies on heavy fuels, report finds

On August 21st, NABU presented its cruise ship ranking 2019. The findings of this year’s evaluation demonstrate that only a small proportion of fleets is becoming cleaner, while the industry by large continues to depend on heavy fuels and fails to employ exhaust technology.

Ship Finance to equip 7 vessels with scrubbers

Ship Finance International announced that it has agreed with a customer to install exhaust gas cleaning systems (scrubbers) on a total of seven vessels ranging in size from 8,700 to 10,600 TEU. In addition, several other of SFL’s container vessels will have scrubbers installed for the charterers account.

Belgian CMB and Japanese TFC to build hydrogen-powered ferry

Compagnie Maritime Belge (CMB), based in Antwerp, and Japanese shipbuilder Tsuneishi Facilities & Craft (TFC) announced their collaboration to construct a hydrogen-powered ferry. TFC will bring its state-of-the-are shipbuilding expertise, whereas CMB Technologies will bring their knowledge on marine hydrogen systems.

Watch: Launch of world’s first electric hydrofoil jet ski

The University of Western Australia teamed up with Perth-based start-up company Electro.Aero, and funding sponsor Galaxy Resources, to develop the world’s first electric hydrofoil personal watercraft, named WaveFlyer. The zero-emission vessel operates rising above the water.

Port of Cannes to impose a 0.1% sulphur cap for cruise ships calling

The French Mediterranean port of Cannes announced that it will implement a 0.1% sulphur cap on the fuel used by the cruise ships calling the port. Further the port issued four recommendations for ports calling in, to protect the environment from air and marine pollution. 

Watch: Japanese consortium to develop first fully electric tanker

A Japanese consortium is to provide new infrastructure services with a focus on electric vessels. Their newly established company, called e5 Lab., will work to develop and promote the greater use of these clean modes of marine transport by building the world’s first zero-emission tanker by mid 2021. 

Greenpeace protests arrival of ship carrying climate-damaging soya

Activists from Greenpeace Germany peacefully protested the import of soya from destroyed forest and savanna regions in Brazil, expected to be carried on the cargo ship “Hiroshima Star” in the Lower Weser river of Germany. The large-scale cultivation of soya plays a major role in emissions, the NGO noted. 

About 2,200 vessels to install scrubbers

In light of the approaching IMO 2020 sulphur cap, Bloomberg suggests that in the following years about 2,200 vessels are to install scrubbers, as if they don’t they will be banned. DNV GL states that putting all those vessels in a line, they’d stretch about 340 miles.

Shell considers solar panels to power Bukom refining site

Reuters reports that Royal Dutch Shell is under discussion for the installation of solar panels to power its Bukom refining site in Singapore. The Bukom manufacturing site includes a 500,000 barrels-per-day refinery, Shell’s largest wholly owned refinery.

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