Interview

Understanding sustainability in maritime industry: Key priorities

Despina Panayiotou Theodosiou, CEO at TOTOTHEO MARITIME & President at WISTA International, defines what sustainability means for shipping, referring to its three pillars – economic, social and environmental – and addressing also key steps to take for action.

Sustainability equals to resilient shipping industry

Referring to key priorities for a robust, resilient and sustainable maritime sector, Mr. Gavin Allwright, Secretary General, IWSA, highlights the need for an integrated approach that will ensure up-stream and down-stream impacts are always assessed in a transparent and collaborative way and emissions aren’t shifted, offset or dumped into other sectors.

Digitalisation a key enabler in progressing to a sustainable future

Maritime still needs a better understanding of sustainability benefits and impacts, says Lloyd’s Register Global Sustainability Manager Katharine Palmer who acknowledges transparency and decarbonisation in connection with digitalisation as the defining trends toward 2050.

Fight against corruption a key issue of sustainability

As shipping faces more regulation and there are wider demands for commercial transparency, we can no longer afford to turn the other cheek and accept corruption as a cost of doing business, notes Leon van Duivendijk, Director Shared Resources, Vroon B.V.

Trends affecting the global marine insurance market

In an exclusive interview with SAFETY4SEA, Mr. Richard Turner, President of IUMI shares, his perspectives on the key challenges impacting the marine insurance market, noting that technology is going to play a major role by changing the current landscape. Technology and digitalization can be viewed as both a risk and an opportunity, Mr. Turner adds.

Decarbonisation of the shipping industry: yes we can, because we must

As the shipping is becoming more and more interested in reducing its emissions, Chris Chatterton, COO of the Methanol Institute, discusses about the challenges arising from decarbonisation for the maritime sector. The next decade and beyond will be far more complex for the shipping industry than the previous one and the carbon challenge sits behind every analysis, Mr. Chatterton argues.

Career Paths: Nick Brown, Bureau Veritas

In our special column this time, we are pleased to host an interview with Mr. Nick Brown, Communications Director, Bureau Veritas Marine & Offshore who says that by accident or luck, PR and communications felt right for a career in shipping, which is a indispensable part of the modern world trade, both a challenging and important industry.

Career Paths: Natalie Shaw, ICS

Mrs Shaw says that studying for her professional qualifications was a worthwhile career investment, even if it impacted negatively her social life for a short time. Also, she suggests to only focus on the important things and delegate others when necessary. Overall, it is important to ‘work to live not live to work’ she concludes, meaning that it is worth putting family, and friends first as much as possible. 

Career Paths: Elias Kariambas, ABS

In our special column this time, we are pleased to host an interview with Mr. Elias Kariambas, Business Development – Greece, ABS, who tells us a few words about his current role and admits that he really enjoys working in this demanding industry. 

Career Paths: Christine Valentin, World Ocean Council

In our special column this time, we have the pleasure to host an interview with Mrs. Christine Valentin, Board Member & Chief Operating Officer,  World Ocean Council (WOC) who explains us the vision of WOC toward ocean sustainability as well as her career path, inspiring us to believe in ourselves and support every professional choices we make.

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