Captain Yves Vandenborn, Director of Loss Prevention highlights that investigations into such incidents show that most are caused by poor training
and knowledge of the correct entry procedures, or a disregard for them. It is therefore vital that all seafarers are aware of the danger of enclosed spaces and learn the correct entry procedures, whether or not it is a  equirement of their role on board.

Seafarers must understand that no enclosed space should be entered without following proper precautions, even in an emergency.

Failure to observe and understand simple enclosed space entry procedures can lead to persons being unexpectedly overcome when entering enclosed spaces. Observance of the principles and procedures outlined will form a reliable basis in reducing the risks for enclosed space entry.

The guide focuses on the most common incidents and accidents that have been reported, such as:

  • Poor rescue plan and incorrect use of rescue equipment
  • Not recognising the dangers of an enclosed space
  • Migration of oxygen-deficient air to an adjacent space
  • Inexperience and not following procedures
  • Extreme heat
  • Carbon monoxide migration
  • Fumigation incidents
  • Oxygen-deficient atmosphere even after correct testing
  • Poor rescue training
  • Not recognising the dangers of an enclosed space, poor emergency rescue training and equipment
  • Incomplete atmosphere testing, person not fit for entry
  • Natural ventilation insufficient

The incidents above, express some common issues that cause incidents, including:

  • poor training
  • failure to follow proper procedures for enclosed space entry
  • failure to recognise the danger of an enclosed space
  • tendency to trust physical senses and forego testing or checks
  • attempts to save a co-worker leading to short cuts and failure to follow procedures
  • failure to manage safely any shore workers on board.

To learn more you may click herebelow

Enclosed space entry