loss prevention

Complexity surrounding carriage of dangerous goods on board

The containerised supply chain is complex. For this reason, TT Club called out any practice that may harm safety. As the Club informed, key targets relate to shipment, handling and carriage of dangerous goods. 2019 has seen a significant increase in incidents regarding shipment of dangerous goods, including a number of high-profile ship fires.

Top 10 risks related to container terminals

TT Club seeks to understand the risks experienced in the transport and logistics industry, providing loss prevention advice to operators as appropriate. In this article, the Club focuses on the findings of recent analysis into the risks faced by container terminals.

Watch: Float to survive in cold water

The UK’s Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) published a video advising what one can do and can act to float on water and not drown. Following its ‘Respect the water’ campaign, falling into cold water shocks the body.

Open manholes and displaced deck gratings could rise hazards

As Gard Club informs, open manholes and displaced gratings can lead to significant dangers to crewmembers on offshore installations, as two recent incidents showcase, reported by the US Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.

How to conduct a safe pilot transfer by helicopter

More and more ports around the world are now using helicopters to transfer the pilot to and from the vessel instead of the more traditional use of a pilot boat, North P&I Club informs. Despite the fact that this means that pilots can now transfer in increasingly challenging weather conditions, it also introduces new risks, of which ships’ crews should be aware of.

Lessons learned: Difficult step causes passenger injury

In its latest Loss Prevention guidance on gangways, the Shipowners Club describes a case of an injury to an elderly passenger disembarking from a tourist craft operating in north-eastern Australia. The Club highlighted a poor implementation of safety management system. 

AMSA reviews the development of standards for domestic commercial vessels

To ensure standards are fit for purpose for the domestic industry, the Australian Maritime Authority (AMSA) is reviewing its approach to setting standards. For this reason, in August 2019, AMSA will be consulting with individual stakeholders, focusing on those who have regular, direct interaction with the technical standards.

How to ensure safe operation of gangways

In light of several gangway claims, the Shipowners Club issued a revised booklet providing guidance on gangway safety. The booklet notes that gangways should have important information marked on their framework, including manufacturers’ name, safe loading (by numbers and weight), model number and the maximum angle for the gangway to be set at.

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