Sunday, September 26, 2021

Tag: California Air Resources Board

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BV to class first LNG Bunkering vessel

Bureau Veritas has been chosen to class the unique LNG bunkering vessel which will be built at Hanjin Heavy Industries, Korea, under an agreement between Japan's NYK and Mitsubishi and France's GDF-SUEZ. The vessel will carry 5,000 cu m of LNG for ships' fuel stored at 4 Bar in two IMO Type C pressure tanks. Delivery is set for 2016 when the vessel will operate from the Fluxys LNG Terminal in Zeebrugge, initially supplying LNG fuel from GDF-SUEZ to the fleet of United European Car Carriers. Philippe Donche-Gay, Executive Vice-President and head of the marine and offshore division of Bureau Veritas, says, "Our experience with every type and size of gas carrier, our lead in the area of dual-fuel and multi-function gas carriers and our ability to support the partners means we can make a real contribution to this initiative. It will help kick-start LNG bunkering, bringing forward the use of this clean fuel in North European waters." The LNG bunker barge will be 111 m LOA, beam 16.8m, draft 4.9m and will have dual-fuel diesel electric propulsion with twin azipods for high manoeuvrability. It will be built and equipped to the highest environmental friendliness standards. Source: Bureau VeritasIn the ...

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Denmark focuses on green maritime solutions

Denmark's official green brand, State of Green, is now launching a new theme on its website focusing on green maritime solutions. As a nation, Denmark has become well-known internationally in the green maritime field and now we intend to become even better at getting this across by means of State of Green's new initiative that focuses on sustainable, green maritime transport and technological solutions. The background is the Danish Government's Plan for Growth in Blue Denmark, one of the goals of which is, inter alia, to promote Danish green maritime solutions. Therefore, State of Green will now - in cooperation with the Danish Maritime Authority and Blue Denmark - focus on a variety of green maritime solutions, technologies as well as the manufacture of marine equipment. On State of Green's website, the profiles of companies, organisations and knowledge institutions are available, just as they are presenting their own green solutions. The overall message that Danish maritime solutions offer green and competitive maritime transport and production for an international market is common to all the profiles presented. Source: DMA  In the onset, I was frank with you propecia before and after has changed my being. It has become much more fun, ...

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Alternative compliance with air emissions regulations in California

California Air Resources Board issued a Marine Notice regarding the compliance with the California Ocean-Going Vessel Fuel Regulation1 during the Air Resources Board Sunset Review Process as follows: The California Ocean-Going Vessel (OGV) Fuel Regulation includes a sunset provision2 which states that the requirements of the California OGV Fuel Regulation will cease to apply if the United States adopts and enforces requirements that will achieve equivalent emissions reductions to the California OGV Fuel Regulation within Regulated California Waters. The provision further states that the California OGV Fuel Regulation requirements will remain in effect until the Executive Officer issues written findings that the federal requirements will achieve equivalent emission reductions and are being enforced within Regulated California Waters. In accordance with this provision, Air Resources Board (ARB) staff is conducting a sunset review as allowed by the California OGV Fuel Regulation. During ARB staff’s sunset review, which is expected to extend beyond January 2015, the California OGV Fuel Regulation will remain in effect and will continue to be enforced. Vessel operators must ensure that they meet both the California OGV Fuel Regulation and the North American Emission Control Area (ECA Regulation) 3 requirements. We do not anticipate any undue difficulty for vessel ...

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Alternative compliance with air emissions regulations in California

California Air Resources Board issues Marine Notice 2014-1 CaliforniaAir Resources Board issued a Marine Notice regarding the compliance with the California Ocean-Going Vessel Fuel Regulation1 during the Air Resources Board Sunset Review Process as follows:The California Ocean-Going Vessel (OGV) Fuel Regulation includes a sunset provision2 which states that the requirements of the California OGV Fuel Regulation will cease to apply if the United States adopts and enforces requirements that will achieve equivalent emissions reductions to the California OGV Fuel Regulation within Regulated California Waters. The provision further states that the California OGV Fuel Regulation requirements will remain in effect until the Executive Officer issues written findings that the federal requirements will achieve equivalent emission reductions and are being enforced within Regulated California Waters.In accordance with this provision, Air Resources Board (ARB) staff is conducting a sunset review as allowed by the California OGV Fuel Regulation. During ARB staffs sunset review, which is expected to extend beyond January 2015, the California OGV Fuel Regulation will remain in effect and will continue to be enforced. Vessel operators must ensure that they meet both the California OGV Fuel Regulation and the North American Emission Control Area (ECA Regulation) 3 requirements. We do not ...

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Fjords may link warming oceans and melting glaciers

In 2013, the research team returned to Sermilik Fjord to find that a large passing iceberg had pushed down the SF1 mooring's top float to depths where increased water pressure caused it to implode. The researchers dragged the bottom of the fjord to recover the mooring. Its instruments survived the trauma and recorded data that helped the researchers learn about ocean's circulation near the glacier. The fatal blow was definitely not the first hit. For 13 months, icebergs had plowed over Mooring SF1, again and again. They pushed the long line of underwater scientific instruments toward the seafloor in a Greenland fjord. Usually, these chunks of ice-sometimes as tall as a skyscraper and as wide as seven city blocks-would hold down SF1 for several hours and then move along, allowing SF1 to resiliently float back up. This may not seem like a safe location for scientific equipment, but the research group deliberately placed SF1 in the line of iceberg fire in Sermilik Fjord, 20 miles from the terminus of Helheim Glacier. This narrow coastal inlet, abutted by steep cliffs, connects at one end to the open ocean; at the other end, the vertical ice face of the glacier forms a ...

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