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Port Health Controls in Brazil

Released by the Gard P&I Club The Gard P&I Club has recently been notified by Members and Clients that the Brazilian National Sanitation Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) appears to enforce local health regulations applicable to ships arriving in Brazilian ports more rigorously.This has been confirmed by our local correspondent in Rio de Janeiro, particularly as concerns documentary evidence of compliance with RDC 72 Articles 60/61 on the control of air conditioning systems and Articles 79/80 on the control of synanthropic fauna specimens harmful to health.Lack of compliance and/or documentary evidence acceptable to theauthorities may result in fines and/or delay of the vessel in port.For more information, click here.Source: The Gard P&I Club

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5 Bulgarian seafarers escape distressed ship in Brazil

Sea Wind ship stranded at the Brazilian port of Fortaleza A total of 5 Bulgarian seafarers have managed to escape the "Sea Wind" ship stranded at the Brazilian port of Fortaleza.Forced by the severe living conditions on the vessel, four seafarers have escaped on a boat, while one has used a raft, the Bulgarian Cherno More paper has reported.On April 12, the 14- member crew ship with 9 Bulgarian seafarers on board was reported to be in distress near the Brazilian shore. The ship, which is transporting marble, has been arrested by Brazilian authorities due to financial debts.There is no electricity on board of the distressed vessel and the seafarers have not received their salaries for a while, it has been reported. According to Stancho Savov, owner of the Bulgarian company in charge of "Sea Wind", the captain of the ship committed a misstake and changed its course without any reason, which has led to the distress.However, the seafarers have said in a letter that the ship's bad technical condition is the main reason why they have been stranded.Source: Novinite

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SA, China, Brazil, Saudi Arabia likely to delay new carbon shipping measures

Delay until 2019 SA, CHINA, Brazil and Saudi Arabia are likely to delay until 2019 adherence to the International Maritime Organisation's (IMO's) newly adopted measures on reducing shipping's greenhouse gas emissions, which come into force in 2013.These four developing countries led the charge that secured the waiver for new ships registered in developing nations until 2019, claiming they needed more time to acquire more advanced technologies, the IMO said. This has sparked criticism that any shipbuilder could apply for the waiver if they flag a ship in a developing country.The South African Maritime Safety Authority (Samsa) is to commission a study next month to determine the economic effect of the proposed changes and limits to emissions on shipping, the authority's executive for operations, Sobantu Tilayi, said yesterday. SA had no ships registered under its flag but the country was heavily dependent on shipping, Mr Tilayi said."Anything that affects the cost of maritime transport invariably affects the economy of the whole country if you accept that 98% of all trade travels by the sea," Mr Tilayi said. Fifty percent of SA's gross domestic product comes from trade."On imports the consumer bears the cost of that, while on exports it affects the ...

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Brazil – Ship Sanitation Control Certificates

Fines are being imposed in certain ports in Rio de Janeiro Club correspondents Representacoes Proinde (Rio) Ltda. Rio de Janeiro, have advised that fines are being imposed in certain ports in Rio de Janeiro State if vessels are unable to produce evidence that insect and rodent infestation have been subject to control procedures within the previous six months.Unlike most other countries, holding a Ship Sanitation Control Exemption Certificate is not considered to be sufficient. Fines are not governed by a set tariff and are typically in the region of US$ 10,000.Earlier this year the Brazilian National Sanitation Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) started to enforce Article 80 of Resolution RDC No. 72 in Itaguai, Rio de Janeiro, Arraial do Cabo and several minor ports. Article 80 states, in part, that "Every six months, all ships must be subject to control procedures of rodent extermination and insects which must be substantiated by records in the ship's log book or certificates". ANVISA deems this requirement to apply regardless of whether or not there is any insect or rodent infestation on board.Since ANVISA requires evidence confirming that such control procedures have been exercised, the presence of a Ship Sanitation Control Exemption Certificate will not suffice. ...

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