wellness at sea

Experts’ thoughts: How shipping may attract young generation

Automation, soft skills and CSR are said to be three key focus areas for industry’s workforce, as shipping accelerates its path towards the smart era and a more sustainable future. Notably, automation will incur a fundamental transformation in the way seafarers work, replacing partly the human element and having an impact on the skills operators will be looking for.

Autonomous tasks may result to seafarers’ boredom

A research published in the International Maritime Health journal alerts that automated onboard tasks for seafarers may reduce attention and vigilance, increase the risk of accidents, and lead to higher levels of smoking, drinking, eating disorders and addictive behaviours amongst crew members.

Global Maritime Forum gives voice to the next generation of maritime talent

Young talents from Nigeria, China and Denmark who wrote about digital seafarers, an emissions trading scheme and circular economy, named winners of the Future Maritime Leaders essay competition. Namely, 140 global essay contributions focused on issues on top of the agenda for the next wave of maritime leaders.

Key actions to enhance seafarers’ wellbeing

During the last SAFETY4SEA Athens Forum, Capt. Yves Vandenborn, Director of Loss Prevention, The Standard Club, discussed seafarers’ wellbeing from the mental and social point of view. Nationalities and different cultures have different ways of socializing, he argued, so companies should adopt new ways to encourage socializing amongst seafarers onboard.

Seafarers significantly concerned over criminalisation

Nautilus International heard the results of the Nautilus Federation report regarding criminalisation in the shipping industry. The results show that approximately 90% of the seafarers questioned, expressed concerns about the issue, while two thirds said it impacted the way they felt about working in the profession.

World Mental Health Day: Suicide of seafarers in the spotlight

Every 40 seconds, someone in the world loses their life to suicide, a figure which could justify a global interest in a greater awareness on mental health issues. On the occasion of the World Mental Health Day 2019 celebrated today, the World Health Organization sheds a focus on suicide prevention.

Building Resilience: Making connections

Good relationships with close family members, friends or others are important. Accepting help and support from those who care about you and will listen to you strengthens resilience. Some people find that being active in civic groups, faith-based organizations or other local groups provides social support and can help with reclaiming hope. Assisting others in their time of need also can benefit the helper.

Key parameters for controlling potable water quality onboard

An effective water management plan is vital for seafarers’ health onboard to ensure that the quality of the potable water follows all hygiene conditions. In this context, there are several important factors that need to be considered in terms of the quality of potable water onboard as well as its effective storage and distribution.

SAFETY4SEA Wellness Survey: Addressing key wellness aspects for people onboard and ashore

Wellness is currently a prominent topic for discussion within the maritime industry; having seafarers who feel engaged and positive is essential to boost morale onboard, and ensure that the focus is on operational excellence and safety. However, let’s not forget the employees working ashore, who also need to work in a healthy working environment where they feel motivated and excited with their role.

Building Resilience: Maintaining a hopeful outlook

Many people find it easier to focus on what it is wrong in their life instead of envisaging a better future. This is because problems are real, causing an unpleasant situation; however maintaining an optimistic outlook enables everyone to expect that good days are coming.

Poll

Does enclosed space entry need more regulation?

maritime events