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Do you know why Bill of Lading is important for shipping?

Shipping of goods is the backbone of global economy and a really complex procedure. Taking into consideration how many stakeholders are involved in the trade process, we cannot help but wonder: How the efficient transfer from party to party is achieved? And how do parties ensure quality of the cargo is maintained through the voyage?

Do you know why FONAR is needed from 2020 and onwards?

With IMO 2020 just around the corner, the shipping industry must already have a plan to comply. However, despite the fact that we are just two months away from this groundbreaking regulation for maritime, there is increased uncertainty regarding compliant fuel oil availability worldwide. In such case, companies should have a plan to deal with such unavailability, with the answer might lying in the Fuel Oil Non-Availability Report (FONAR).

Do you know what Plimsoll lines on ships are?

Have you ever wondered what Plimsoll lines are? And why are they called Plimsoll? Professionals across the shipping industry may be familiar with the term, but even those not working in the industry, but who are extra observative, may have noticed that ships have some line marks on their hull, just above the waterline. These are Plimsoll lines.

Do you know why ships are red on bottom?

Chances are you have never salvaged a vessel yourself or you have (hopefully) never seen a vessel upside down. But in case you have seen photos of a shipwreck or of a new ship getting launched from shipyard, you may have noticed that the bottom of a ship is most times red.

Five sustainability challenges for shipping by 2030

Managing cost, digitalization and environmental regulations are some of the key challenges shipping will have to encounter in the next 5-10 years, industry experts said on the sidelines of the latest SAFETY4SEA Athens Forum, which took place in Eugenides Foundation on 2 October.

What causes seasickness and how to encounter it

Seasickness is the top worst holiday discomfort and all of us have—or will—succumb to seasickness on rough waters, research shows. Seasickness is a result of a conflict in the inner ear, where the human balance mechanism resides, and is caused by a vessel’s erratic motion on the water.

Why do ships use ‘port’ and ‘starboard’ and not ‘left’ or ‘right’

As port and starboard never change, they are unambiguous references that are independent of a mariner’s orientation, and, as a result, mariners use these nautical terms instead of left and right to avoid confusion. As NOAA informs, when looking forward, toward the bow of a ship, port and starboard refer to the left and right sides, respectively.

Who is who at an oil spill: Roles and responsibilities

An oil spill is the potential adverse effect of most maritime incidents. Oil spills can have disastrous consequences, environmentally and economically. Oil spill response at sea is most times a complex procedure, because of the remoteness of the site or the number of interested parties.

IMO 2020 & Tank Cleaning: What you need to know

Compliance with 2020 sulphur cap is more than simply switching to a low sulphur fuel. HSFO, the fuel that was used so far but now will be inappropriate unless there are scrubbers installed, is primarily based on residual fuel and tends to adhere to the inside of fuel tanks. As such, a proper tank cleaning becomes necessary.

What does ‘Vessel on Master’s orders and Pilot’s advice’ mean

As the North P&I Club informs, it is well known that in most places around the world the presence of pilot on the bridge does not relieve the Master or officer in charge of the watch from their duties or obligations for the safety of the ship. However, there are many cases where the Master appears to relinquish control to the pilot or fails to challenge a possible unsafe instruction, sometimes leading to an incident.

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