fire onboard

Singapore reveals ‘world’s most powerful’ firefighting ship

The Singapore Civil Defence Force commissioned three new marine firefighting vessels, including what is considered the world’s most powerful in terms of water output, on Tuesday, August 20. The heavy fire vessel ‘Red Sailfish’ can pump out 240,000 litres of seawater a minute. It will start operation from 2020.

Yantian Express will remain in Bahamas until further notice

Containership Yantian Express has remained in Freeport, Bahamas because some shippers have not posted General Average/salvage security, although they have offloaded all fire damaged containers from the vessel. The Yantian Express is not to depart from Freeport until late April, or Early May. Even its sail destination, when departing from Freeport, remains unknown.

Vale Malaysia shipments to normally continue despite fire

Vale informed on February 15, that there was a fire in one of the transfer houses of the belt conveyor system at its distribution centre in Malaysia. Vale anticipate this will result in a 10 to 15 day stop in operations and note that a planned 10 day shutdown for maintenance was already scheduled for this period.

Two Captains recognized with IMO bravery award

Pilots Captain Michael G. McGee and Captain Michael C. Phillips, from Houston were recognized for their role in averting a tragedy in September 2016, when the tanker they were piloting broke down in the Houston Ship Channel in the middle of the night and burst into flames, after colliding with mooring dolphins.

Cefor: Fires onboard continue to keep insurers busy

The Nordic Association of Marine Insurers ( Cefor) issued an annual report to provide an overview of the marine insurance market during 2015. The report includes statistics with a focus on vessels built in Asia and reveals the ocean hull trends. Last year, Cefor reported that costly fires and explosions even rose slightly concluding that ”fires are few in number, very costly, and continue to keep insurers busy”

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