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Understanding Fatigue: How to avoid jet lag

Our body has its own internal clock, or circadian rhythms, that signals when to stay awake and when to sleep; As a result, travellers are affected by jet lag that can cause daytime fatigue, an unwell feeling, difficulty in staying alert as well as gastrointestinal problems.

Understanding Fatigue: Why time awake needs control

Missing a night of sleep isn’t uncommon but does affect you. How long an individual is awake affects sleepiness and consequently fatigue levels. The longer an individual has been awake, the poorer his/her performance.

Understanding Fatigue: Why good sleep is important

The amount of sleep we need each day will change over the course of our life. On average an adult aged 18 years or older needs 7–8 hours a day, however, sleep needs vary from person to person. Lack of sleep and poor quality of sleep and rest can cause fatigue, which is considered as the silent risk factor for seafarers.

Shell: A zero-incident industry is top priority

During LISW 2019, Dr. Grahaeme Henderson, Vice President, Shipping & Maritime at Shell International Trading and Shipping Company Ltd, highlighted how important is for the industry to continue its efforts on seafarers’ mental health and wellbeing and shared examples of Shell’s work towards a zero-incident future.

Understanding Fatigue: How body clock can make or break our health

We are all biologically programmed to be active during the day and to sleep at night. Each individual has a body clock, and this clock regulates the body’s circadian rhythm. The body clock makes a person sleepy or alert on a regular schedule whether they are working or not. In normal conditions, the sleep/wake cycle follows a 24-hour rhythm; however, the cycle is not the same for everyone.

Committed crew prevents accident of cruise vessel entering port

CHIRP issued its 56th Maritime Feedback focusing on reports discussing the impacts of fatigue and the importance of seafarers’ wellbeing when onboard. Managing stress and sleeping well at sea is an integral part of positive health and well-being on board, given that fatigue is a leading factor in accidents.

STCW: Setting the hours of rest for watch personnel

One of the significant amendments of STCW aimed to address the problem of fatigue, which is a raising concern for the maritime industry, by establishing the minimum hours of rest for watch personnel while at the same time harmonizing them with the MLC, 2006 provisions.

AMSA launches survey on fatigue for seafarers on domestic commercial vessels

AMSA launched the ‘Fatigue Survey – Domestic Commercial Vessels’ focusing on the importance of seafarers’ wellbeing when onboard. The survey aims to get an insight into how seafarers cope with fatigue in order to develop specific guidance, while also encourage safe management practices.  

Bulk carrier contact with wharf associated to fatigue

NTSB issued an investigation report on the contact of the bulk carrier ‘Shandong Fu En’ with the Ergon-St. James Terminal Wharf, on the Lower Mississippi River, in April 2018. The report highlighted poor judgement resulting from fatigue as key cause of the incident. 

Feeling fatigue at sea: The importance of seafarers’ wellbeing

Working onboard a ship is a routine; Seafarers – regardless their ranking – live, interact and sometimes perform functions in the same place. Fatigue can trigger sadness and vice versa while active engagement in social life onboard has a real and positive impact on seafarer’s welfare.

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