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Inaugural meeting on the Navigation Safety Advisory Group

Aiming to provide expert industry advice on navigational safety The first meeting of the Navigation Safety Advisory Group (NSAG) was held at theAustralian Maritime Safety Authority's (AMSA) head office in Canberra on 25 August.NSAG is the peak consultative body to AMSA for matters relating to AMSA's responsibilities for the safety of navigation in Australian waters. The group's role is to provide a forum for members to discuss issues of common interest and concern in relation to the safety of navigation.Additionally, the group aims to provide expert industry advice on nautical, navigational safety and aids to navigation matters. NSAG will meetevery six months, in February and August each year.Approximately twenty five people, either navigation practitioners or representing organisations with an interest in safety of navigation, from all over Australia attended.The Australian Hydrographic Service, port and state marine authorities, Carnival Australia, Shipping Australia Limited, Australian Shipowners Association, TasPorts, Newcastle Port Corporation, shipping companies (and their peak bodies) and coastal pilots were represented.During the day-long meeting, the group dealt with navigational safety matters in two parts:Nick Lemon (AMSA, ManagerShip Safety) chaired the first part, which dealt mainly with shipboard issues. Outcomes from recent IMO meetings, progress with the development of e-navigation, ECDIS matters, ...

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China Maritime Safety Authority officials commence exchange program with AMSA

The program will run until early December On Monday 29 August, five officials from the China Maritime Safety Authority commenced an exchange program with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA).The program commenced with a welcome by AMSA's Executive Management Group and the remainder of the first week will involve familiarisation meetings and discussions with the various divisions of AMSA and other Australian Government maritime agencies and institutions.Subsequent components of the program will entail travel to AMSA's regional offices and ports.The officers bring to AMSA a diverse range of backgrounds and experience in ship navigation; port and flag State control; the International Safety Management Code; and accident investigation. Their interests include:Port Statecontrol ISM audit Law enforcement Australia's maritime legislation Maritime labour convention, 2006 Vessel traffic services and other aids to navigation Engineering management Management of Particularly Sensitive Sea Areas Pollution and ship casualty response Search and rescue Regulation of commercial and recreational vessels Career planningThe program will run until early DecemberSource: AMSA

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AMSA to become the sole maritime regulator as a win for safety and training

MUA claims this will improve the training and employment conditions for seafarers The Maritime Union of Australia has welcomed COAG's decision to make AMSA the sole maritime regulator as a win for safety and training across the industry.MUA National Secretary Paddy Crumlin said that if properly implemented, the reform will deliver seafarers improved training and employment pathways."The Federal Government, and particularly Minister Anthony Albanese, deserve credit for steering this crucial reform through COAG, with the assistance of the states and the Northern Territory," Mr Crumlin said."This will allow seafarers to move seamlessly around the nation, ensuring their qualifications and licenses are recognised anywhere in Australia."AMSA also has the potential to improve safety for seafarers across the nation, by introducing the highest possible standard to all jurisdictions."Mr Crumlin said the MUA now looked forward to seeing the intergovernmental agreement that will give effect to the decision.He said today's decision was a major step forward in implementing the broader agenda of maritime reform."Along with shipping reform, ratification of the Maritime Labour Convention and a National Ports Strategy, this government has shown it has the appetite for much needed industry reform."Source: MUA

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AMSA issues notice re navigation safety in the vicinity of barges

A number of accidents involving collisions with anchored barges The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) issued a notice reminding seafarers, others involved in the operation of barges, and those engaged in operations in the vicinity of barges, of aspects of the COLREGS which relate to safe operations.There have been a number of accidents and incidents, some fatal, involving collisions with anchored barges or barges being towed.The purpose of this Marine Notice is therefore to remind seafarers, and all others involved with the operation of barges, or operations in the vicinity ofbarges, of aspects of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (1972) - the "COLREGS" - which relate to safe operations.The COLREGS have been carefully examined in the context of incidents involving barges and have been found to be adequate if properly adheredto. The following extracts include elements of the COLREGS that AMSA believes are particularly relevant to navigation safety in the vicinity ofbarges.Masters, skippers or coxswains, and all deck watchkeepers need to thoroughly know and understand the full COLREGS and theirapplication in all situations.For further information, click here.Source: AMSA

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AMSA issues notice re guidance in reducing the risk of collision with cetaceans

These collisions are common due to more vessels and whales The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) issued a notice providing guidance in reducing the risk of collision with cetaceans (e.g., whales, dolphins, porpoises). Seafarers are reminded that the Australian Whale Sanctuary encompasses all Commonwealth waters from the three nautical mile state waters limit out to the limit of the EEZ.The purpose of this Marine Notice is to provide guidance to shipowners and operators in reducing the risk of collision with cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises), in accordance with IMO Circular MEPC.1/Circ.674.Collision with cetaceans (ship strikes) is an issue of growing concern and has become more common due to the increase in both vessel traffic and whale populations. Ship strikes can cause damage to property and increase the risk of death and injury to people and animals. Damage to vessels, ranging from minor to extreme, includes cracked hulls, damaged propellers, propeller shafts and rudders, damaged port and starboard aft strut actuators, broken steering arms and ruptured seawater piping.FOr more information, click here.Source: AMSA

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AMSA issues notice reminding that all ships should receive all Maritime Safety Information

By configuring the vessel's Inmarsat-C Enhanced Group Calling (EGC The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) issued a notice reminding masters that all ships transiting NAVAREA X or otherwise approaching the Australian coast should ensure that they can receive all Maritime Safety Information (MSI) necessary for the intended voyage.This generally can be done by configuring the vessel's Inmarsat-C Enhanced Group Calling (EGC) receivers for the NAVAREA X and coastal warning areas appropriate for the intended voyage.To view more, click here.Source: AMSA

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AMSA publishes Industry Passage Plan for the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait

Covering the mandatory coastal pilotage areas The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) has published an Industry Passage Plan covering the mandatory coastal pilotage areas of the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait.The publication contains standard passage plans through the compulsory pilotage areas, including waypoints and courses. It is envisaged that vessels will take account of such details when planning a passage via the Great Barrier Reef or Torres Strait and plot the waypoints and courses on their charts or enter them into their electronic chart systems. If, after boarding a vessel, the pilot finds that the Industry Passage Plan has been adopted, only minor adjustments to the plan may be required depending on operational conditions.The publication also contains guidance and information on:Routes and draught restrictionsMandatory reporting requirements (REEFVTS)Charts that should be carriedEquipment requirementsPilot ladders and boarding arrangementsMaster/Pilot information exchangePilot CardPilotage guidanceBridge resource managementCoastal pilotage risk managementAlthough compliance is not obligatory, AMSA encourages all Masters that are due to transit any of the compulsory pilotage areas in the Great Barrier Reef and/or Torres Strait to consider the recommendations when preparing their passage plans. The publication may also be kept on the bridge for reference, and for discussion during the Master/Pilot information ...

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Updated AMSA Survival at Sea Manual

This publication is used as a training and instruction manual AMSA releases Marine Notice advises of the release of updated publication Survival at Sea. This publication is used as a training and instruction manual to provide a comprehensive guide on distress situations and emergencies at sea.This instruction manual assists in meeting international and Australian requirements for the saving of life at sea including appliances to be carried and the measures to be observed on ships. Survival at Sea provides an indispensable information source for all mariners.The international and Australian requirements in respect of life-saving appliances including emergency training and drills are implemented bythe Navigation Act 1912 and Marine Orders (MO) Part 25 - Equipment Life-saving. MO Part 25 gives effect to Chapter III of SOLAS, including giving effect to the LSA Code, and prescribes matters for the purposes of sections 215 and 228 of the Navigation Act.These requirements include that one copy of the latest edition of the Survival at Sea Instruction Manual is provided for each crew member onboard, and in each survival craft on Australian registered ships to which MO Part 25 applies. SOLAS specifies that all ships over 500 gross tons must have survival instructions in recreation ...

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AMSA issued a notice regarding carriage of electronic nautical publications

A notice providing guidance The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) issued a notice providing guidance regarding use of electronic nautical publications on board ships to meet the carriage requirements for nautical publications as set out in Chapter V (Safety of Navigation) of the SOLAS Convention.To view the Notice please click hereSource: Australian Maritime Safety Authority

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