SAFETY4SEA Team

SAFETY4SEA Team

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Changes to the LSA Code and SOLAS – requirements for lifejackets

Changes to the LSA Code and SOLAS - requirements for lifejackets Amendments to Chapter II of the International Life-Saving Appliance (LSA) Code come into effect on July 1, 2010, and introduce the following new requirements for the approval of lifejackets:Each lifejacket shall be fitted with a whistle firmly secured by a lanyard.Lifejacket lights and whistles shall be selected and secured to the lifejacket in such a way that their performance in combination is not degraded.Each lifejacket shall be provided with a releasable buoyant line or other means to secure it to a lifejacket worn by another person in the water.Each lifejacket shall be provided with a suitable means to allow a rescuer to lift the wearer from the water into a survival craft or rescue boat.The requirements apply:to lifejackets provided on board ships constructed (having their keel laid) on or after July 1, 2010 when providing new lifejackets to vessels with a keel laying date before July 1, 2010.andNew requirements for the carriage of additional equipment, also effective July 1, 2010, have been introduced under the SOLAS Convention, as follows:On all ships where adult lifejackets are not designed to fit persons weighing up to 140 kg with a chest girth...

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STCW 2010 Amendments : What you need to know

STCW 2010 Amendments : What you need to know It is widely known that IMO was holding a Diplomatic Conference in Manila, Philippines, earlier this year to discuss amendments to STCW. What most people fail to identify is the extend of revisions and the implementation realities behind that. To sort things straight lets see what happened step by step:STCW Manila AmendmentsOn June 25th, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and other major stakeholders in the global shipping and manning industry formally ratified the so-called "Manila Amendments" to the current Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) and its associated Code. The amendments aiming to bring the STCW up to date with developments since its conception and initial adoption in 1978, and the subsequent amendments in 1995.Enty Into ForceThe Convention amendments will be adopted with a tacit acceptance procedure which has been agreed indicating that amendments will be accepted by 1st July 2011 UNLESS more than 50% of the parties to the STCW object such a development. As a result STCW Amendments are set to enter into force on January 1, 2012.Enhancement of STCW ObjectivesThe following items outline the key improvements realised through the new Amendments:Certificates of Competency...

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Quick guide to EIAPP certification

DNV issues quick guide to MARPOL Annex VI, regulation 13 In connection with the revised MARPOL Annex VI 2009 edition, DNV has experienced an increase in class enquiries related to requirements for NOx emissions from marine diesel engines.New and stricter NOx emission requirements lead to new challenges related to, among other things, new technologies, the rebuilding of engines, etc. In this newsletter, we will try to clarify some of the new expressions introduced in the regulation and answer some frequently asked questions related to MARPOL Annex VI, Reg. 13.Emission RequirementsThere are three levels of allowable NOx emissions from diesel engines, depending on the vessel's keel laying date or the engine installation date. The emission levels are called Tier I (applicable from 1 January 2000), Tier II (applicable from 1 January 2011) and Tier III (applicable from 1 January 2016, ECAs only). For more information, please see Reg. 13, parts 35.Definition of a ' major conversion'Whenever you intend to modify or replace an engine, or install an additionalone, on board a vessel, you need to evaluate whether this will influencethe EIAPP certification of the engine in question. According to Reg. 13, anychanges defined as a "major conversion" will influence the EIAPP...

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Maintenance and Inspection of Life Saving Appliances

The Cayman Registry issues Notice 10/2011 The Cayman Registry issues Notice 10/2011 regarding Maintenance and Inspection of Life Saving Appliances as follows:1. BACKGROUND1.1 This notice offers general guidelines for the maintenance inspection and testing of life saving appliances on Cayman Flag vessel and it is not intended to replace the requirements of the appropriate International Conventions in force.1.2 This information was previously available in Shipping Notice 03/2004, however changes in Convention requirements have superseded the information in SN 03/2004.1.3 Shipping Notice 03/2004 is now withdrawn and replaced by this Notice.2. OPERATIONAL READINESS2.1 Before the ship leaves port and at all times during the voyage, all life-saving appliances shall be in working order and ready for immediate use. If life saving appliances are under repair, then suitable alternative arrangements approved by the Cayman Islands Shipping Registry should be made to ensure an equivalent level of safety is maintained3. WEEKLY TESTING AND INSPECTION3.1 All survival craft, rescue boats and launching appliances inspected to ensure that they are ready for immediate use.3.2 Lifeboat and rescue boat engines run ahead and astern.3.3 General Alarm and Public Address Systems tested.3.4 Lifeboats (other than free fall lifeboats) moved from their stowed position to demonstrate satisfactory operation...

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14 Reasons: why ship owners prefer Filipino seafarers and how they exploit them

One-third of the world's seafarers are Filipinos The chairman of International Mariners Management Association of Japan (IMMAJ) has stated that Filipino seafarers are the top choice of philippine1Japanese ship managers and owners. It is a fact that one-third of the world's seafarers are Filipinos. Data from the Philippine Overseas Employment Agency (POEA) shows that 266,533 Filipino seafarers were deployed all over the world in 2007. Out of this, more than 50,000 Filipino seafarers work on Japan's 3,000 merchant ships. This indicates that roughly 65 percent of Japan's maritime personnel are Filipinos.Also Hellespont, an European shipping company having a manpower agency in Manila, has been hiring all-Filipino crews for its tanker fleet since 2004. This confirms that Filipino seafarers are the most sought seafarers in the global shipping industry. In fact, Filipinos are in demand to man ships at sea - from luxury cruise ships to giant tankers and container ships.Why most of the shipping companies prefer Filipino seafarers ? How they exploit them ?Here are some reasons:1.Seafarers by Nature: Philippines has vast coast line of 36,289 km, that is more than USA (19,924 km), UK (12,429 km), China (14,500 km), France (4,668 km) except Russia (37,653 km) which is almost...

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Maximum period of shipboard service for seafarers

AMSA issues Marine Notice The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) has issued Marine Notice to advise vessel owners, operators, masters and crews of AMSA's approach to implementing the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 (MLC, 2006) requirements in relation to the maximum continuous period that a seafarer can serve on board a vessel without taking leave. It also outlines how these requirements will be enforced during AMSA port State control (PSC) inspections.BackgroundMLC, 2006 entered into force both in Australia and internationally on 20 August 2013. Since that time, AMSA has incorporated MLC, 2006 inspections within its structured PSC inspection regime.Recently, AMSA inspectors have identified occurrences of seafarer service periods extending well beyond 11 months. While AMSA has received complaints in relation to these occurrences, in some cases the crew members have subsequently agreed to additional service extensions. However, the AMSA inspectors have not always been comfortable that such service extensions have met the "mutual agreement" requirements of MLC, 2006 Regulation 2.1 - Seafarers' Employment Agreements.MLC, 2006The relevant sections of MLC, 2006, Regulation 2.4 - Entitlement to leave and Regulation 2.5 - Repatriation, which make reference to the maximum continuous period that a seafarer can serve on board a vessel without taking leave,...

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Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm System (BNWAS) required for older ships

A new SOLAS Amendment clarifies installation of BNWAS for ships built before 1 July 2002 The Maritime Safety Committee at its 92nd session adopted Resolution MSC.350(92) with amendments toSOLAS coming into force on 1 January 2015. The amendments to SOLAS Chapter V now set a clear timeschedule for the implementation of a BNWAS for ships built before 1 July 2002. Time schedule for the required BNWAS is set as follows:1) passenger ships irrespective of size, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2016;2) cargo ships of 3,000 gross tonnage and upwards, not later than the first survey after 1 January 2016;3) cargo ships of 500 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 3,000 gross tonnage, not later than thefirst survey after 1 January 2017; and4) cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 gross tonnage, not later than the firstsurvey after 1 January 2018.Administrations may exempt ships from the requirement when such ships will be taken permanently out ofservice within two years after the implementation date.The term "first survey" means the first annual survey, the first periodical survey or the first renewal survey whichever is due firstafter the date specified or any other survey...

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Spare Charges, Additional Fire Extinguishers and Refilling of Extinguishers

Class NK -TEC 0868 The Panama Government informed ClassNK the special requirements for Spare Charges, Additional Fire Extinguishers and Refilling of Extinguishers onboard the Panama flag vessels (Merchant Marine Circular No.226) as follows.1. Spare charges and Refilling for portable fire extinguishers(1) Spare charges shall be provided for 100% of the first 10 extinguishers and 50% of the remaining fire extinguishers capable of being recharged onboard. Not more than 60 total spare charges are required. Instructions for recharging should be carried onboard.(2) For fire extinguishers which can not be recharged onboard, additional portable fire extinguishers of the same quantity, type, capacity and number as determined in above (1) shall be provided.(3) Periodic refilling of the cylinders should be in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. Only refills approved for the extinguisher may be used for recharging. Partially emptied extinguishers should be recharged.For more information, click hereSource: ClassNK

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Special requirements for breathing apparatus cylinders

Means of recharging breathing apparatus cylinders and spare cylinders ClassNK has issued Technical Information regarding the special requirements for means of recharging breathing apparatus cylinders and spare cylinders regarding UK, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Gibraltar and the Isle of Man flagged vessels.With regard to the additional requirements for relevant equipment of fire-fighter's outfit, it had been notified by the Technical Information (No.: TEC-0990, Date: 24 June 2014) for existing ships (ships which are constructed (keel-laid) before 1 July 2014) and by Amendments to Part R of the RULES FOR THE SURVEY AND CONSTRUCTION OF STEEL SHIP on 26 February 2014 for new ships (ships which are constructed (keel-laid) on or after 1 July 2014).With regard to thThe Administrations of the UK, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Gibraltar and the Isle of Man have issued special requirements for means of recharging breathing apparatus cylinders and spare cylinders as follows.In addition to the fully charged spare cylinders required by the regulations for each Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA), where no means for recharging such cylinders is provided on board, sufficient additional spare cylinders must be provided for training purposes.Factors to be considered by the ship owner when deciding upon...

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