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Japan ratifies Bunker Convention and Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention

Japan has approved ratification of the ‘International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage, 2001’ and the ‘Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks, 2007’. Japan also amended the ‘Act on Liability for Oil Pollution Damage’ (the Act) in order to reflect the provisions of the two conventions. The amended Act will apply by March 2020.

Raysut II wreck removal off Oman successfully completed

Resolve Marine Group announced that it completed the wreck removal of the bulk cement carrier MV Raysut II, which grounded off the pristine beaches of Al-Fazayah Beach, Salalah. Raysut II, left the Port of Salalah in May 2018 when the port was evacuated because adverse weather conditions. The vessel lost headway and steerage and grounded on Fazayah Beach on 26th May 2018.

Casualties in the 21st Century – How Are We Coping?

Sam Kendall-Marsden, head of claims for The Standard Club, provided a future look to emerging trends and significant issues in the world of salvage and wreck removal. Mr Kendall-Marsden focuses on mega boxship casualties, in waste management, technology, the changing nature of the salvage industry and Wildcards.

Canada accedes to Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention

Canada has become the 44th State to accede to the IMO’s Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention, which covers the legal basis for States to remove, or have removed, shipwrecks, drifting ships, objects from ships at sea, and floating offshore installations.

Port of Rotterdam begins salvaging wrecked ship

Port of Rotterdam announced that it began operations, along with Rijkswaterstaat (The Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management), salvaging a shipwreck in the Nieuwe Waterweg. When the facility is ready, it will be the first time that vessels with a draft of 15 metres will be able to voyage and reach the Botlekhavens. The wreck removal will enable more than 50% of cargo to be transported by vessels in that area.

Watch: Wreck Removal of the SSV Jupiter 1

Mammoet Salvage, an engineered heavy lifting and transport company, released a video of what it says was one of the most daring salvage operations ever undertaken in the Gulf of Mexico. The video presents the company’s wreck removal project of the Jupiter 1, that a part of it sank off mexico in April 2011.

Bill C-64 in protection of Canada’s marine environment launched

The Government of Canada via its ‘Ocean Protection Plan’ is acting to prevent its eco-marine environment from being affected as wrecked, abandoned, and hazardous vessels, including small boats, pose environmental, economic, and safety hazards, and are a concern for coastal and inland water communities across Canada via yesterday’s passage of Bill C-64: the Wrecked, Abandoned or Hazardous Vessels Act.

Guyana ratifies treaties for safe and clean shipping

Guyana ratified two key IMO measures aimed to preserve bio-diversity: the Ballast Water Management Convention and another on use of harmful anti-fouling systems on ships hulls. It also ratified others regarding unlawful acts against the safety of navigation and removing wrecks from the seabed. In addition, it signed four instruments covering liability and compensation.

The first Japanese battleship wreck from WWII found

Researchers from the organization started by philanthropist Paul Allen found the wreck of the first Japanese battleship sunk by the U.S. Navy during World War II. The 1914-built Hiei was a Japanese battlecruiser, one of the most heavily-armed vessels of its era, having eight 14-inch guns and armour up to nine inches thick. The vessel was crippled by a shell from the USS San Francisco on the 13th which disabled the steering gear. 

IMO focuses on wreck removal challenges

A ship wreck can be a barrier to navigation. It is a possibility that other vessels and crew can face dangerous situations ,depending on the nature of the cargo and remaining fuel on board, a wreck may also cause damage to marine environments and other coastal interests.

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