women in shipping

Sort by:

Filter by:



CSR(8)Finance(1)Fishery(2)Green Shipping(1)Infographic(1)Maritime Knowledge(3)Offshore(1)Opinions(19)Ports(2)Seafarers(18)Shipping(10)Smart(2)Sustainability(11)Videos(18)Women in shipping(205)

UK launches maritime careers campaign

Maritime UK has initiated a new national Maritime Careers campaign, aiming to promote career opportunities across Britain’s £46.1bn maritime sector. The nationwide campaign is being launched in response to recommendations within the government’s Maritime 2050 strategy, launched in January.

Canada provides marine training for underrepresented groups

Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport of Canada, announced that the country is providing funding over three years to the British Columbia Institute of Technology to deliver a program to increase access to marine training courses for women, Northerners, Inuit and Indigenous people through the Oceans Protection Plan. BCIT and Camosun will also cooperate with various industry partners, marine employers, and Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary.

Day of the Seafarer 2019 to focus on gender equality

This year, as always, the annual Day of the Seafarer (DotS) will be celebrated on 25 June. Throughout 2019 there will be a strong emphasis on the importance and value of women within the professional ranks. This year, the campaign hashtag is: #IAmOnBoard. In addition, a more specific and targeted element of the overall campaign will be ‘Make one change’. 

ILO: Recommendations to ensure equal opportunities for seafarers

The Sectoral Meeting on the Recruitment and Retention of Seafarers and the Promotion of Opportunities for Women Seafarers took place in Geneva from 25 February to 1 March 2019. The Meeting agreed on specific conclusions regarding the recruitment and retention of seafarers, as well as the promotion of opportunities for women seafarers.

Social justice in maritime: A continuous fight for equality?

Female seafarers marked themselves lower than the general average in the latest Seafarers Happiness Index while deck crew and officers tended to be happier than their engineering counterparts. How does the industry challenging injustice and valuing diversity though? Are any equal opportunities out there?

Crew workforce: Future trends and challenges

As modern control systems and autonomous shipping modules perform more tasks and there is massive disruption of maritime jobs, a wider array of education and skills-building are required to meet future demands. There are two uncertainties though: Will well-prepared seafarers be able to keep up in the race with autonomous systems? And which will be the most important requirements for ship operators to survive the maritime workforce of the future?

Thoughts on future crew manning challenges

It is a fact that in year 2018, seafarers’ non-technical skills are overlooked by recruitment departments, although digitalization and automation on board ships is creating demand of seafarers with skills that go beyond what machines are capable of and therefore are a crucial part of fostering a dynamic workforce. What differentiates the low performing from the high performing crews, though?

Why shipping must shed focus on human rights at sea

Human rights at sea gains significant attention of the maritime community. Due to its diversified identity, shipping constitutes a friendly field for human rights abuses, with human trafficking, illegal migration, slavery and abuse in fishing sector and even the unsafe working conditions in many Southeast Asian ship recycling facilities being among the key areas of concern.

  • 1
  • 2

Poll

Does enclosed space entry need more regulation?

maritime events