wellness at sea

Feeling stressed onboard: Symptoms and key actions

Fighting stress onboard is both challenging and crucial. Although much of our everyday stress can be useful in a way of noticing a problem or the pressures that we face, triggering us to act, in general, repeated and prolonged stress  may have negative effects on our mental health. Focusing on seafarers’ safety and wellness onboard,  a self-help guide, issued previously by ISWAN in cooperation with the Shipowners’ Club, provides practical tips to seafarers to better deal with stress and be able to recognize its symptoms and face a stressful situation.

Long working hours, isolation risk seafarers’ mental health

A research conducted by Cardiff University, sets out to explore mental health and well-being among seafarers working in the international cargo shipping industry. Long working hours, isolation and extended periods away from home, put seafarers at risk of poor mental health, the study finds.

Seafarer interaction presents highest rank in last 5 years

The Mission to Seafarers in support of the Shipowners Club launches its Q3 2019 “Seafarers Happiness Index” highlighting that there has been an improvement of seafarers’ wellness onboard vessels, presenting an increasing to 6.59/10 from the previous 6.27, marking a promising and better future in respect of the seafarers and their life onboard.

Understanding Fatigue: Why time awake needs control

Missing a night of sleep isn’t uncommon but does affect you. How long an individual is awake affects sleepiness and consequently fatigue levels. The longer an individual has been awake, the poorer his/her performance.

Effective Crew Project: Stable vs fluid crews within shipping

Started in April 2019 and led by Solent University, the ‘Effective Crew Project’ examined the implementation of either a stable or a fluid crewing strategy on board merchant vessels. Dr. Kate Pike, Associate Professor Emeritus, Warsash Maritime Science and Engineering of Solent University and one of the researchers of the project, shares its key findings.

How to keep fit on board

Staying fit has numerous health benefits, as it makes us physically and mentally stronger. Seafarers are not an exception and the Seafarers’ Health Information Programme published a guide containing examples of on board exercises.

Experts’ thoughts: How shipping may attract young generation

Automation, soft skills and CSR are said to be three key focus areas for industry’s workforce, as shipping accelerates its path towards the smart era and a more sustainable future. Notably, automation will incur a fundamental transformation in the way seafarers work, replacing partly the human element and having an impact on the skills operators will be looking for.

Autonomous tasks may result to seafarers’ boredom

A research published in the International Maritime Health journal alerts that automated onboard tasks for seafarers may reduce attention and vigilance, increase the risk of accidents, and lead to higher levels of smoking, drinking, eating disorders and addictive behaviours amongst crew members.

Global Maritime Forum gives voice to the next generation of maritime talent

Young talents from Nigeria, China and Denmark who wrote about digital seafarers, an emissions trading scheme and circular economy, named winners of the Future Maritime Leaders essay competition. Namely, 140 global essay contributions focused on issues on top of the agenda for the next wave of maritime leaders.

Key actions to enhance seafarers’ wellbeing

During the last SAFETY4SEA Athens Forum, Capt. Yves Vandenborn, Director of Loss Prevention, The Standard Club, discussed seafarers’ wellbeing from the mental and social point of view. Nationalities and different cultures have different ways of socializing, he argued, so companies should adopt new ways to encourage socializing amongst seafarers onboard.

Poll

Does enclosed space entry need more regulation?

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