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Measures to improve compliance of RMI vessels in US ports

The detention rate of RMI flagged vessels in US ports has increased The Republic of the Marshall Inslands issued notice to inform and raise the awareness of shipowners, operators, Masters, and officers and Recognized Organizations (ROs) of the recent increase in detentions of vessels, including Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) flagged vessels, calling in United States (US) ports and to reinforce performance and compliance measures as provided for in the RMI Maritime Act (MI-107) and RMI Regulations (MI-108). These performance and compliance measures are for the benefit of the entire RMI registered fleet and are not intended to penalize a ship, its crew, shipowners, or operators.All vessels calling at any port, including US ports are required to comply fully with national and international standards for safety, security, environmental protection and the welfare of seafarers.The RMI Maritime Administrator has noted a marked increase in the number of ships being detained due to a single substandard condition. Although the Administrator frequently publishes Marine Notices (MNs), Marine Safety Advisories (MSAs) and other guidance regarding prevention methods, substandard conditions are still being found during port State control (PSC) examinations and other boardings.Such conditions include:a blocked or tied open quick closing fuel oil valve;the ...

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USTDA supports study on Panama Canal LNG terminal

  The U.S. Trade and Development Agency awarded a grant to the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) to support the planning of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal.  When the Panama Canal expansion project is completed next year, the Canal is expected to handle significant LNG tanker traffic.  In order to capitalize on this growth, the ACP is interested in developing LNG-related infrastructure projects, including an import terminal. “The U.S. Government is very pleased to partner with the Panama Canal Authority through this USTDA grant as the ACP looks to develop a LNG import terminal in the coming years to take advantage of the Canal expansion project,” said Chargé d’Affaires Kevin M. O’Reilly, who signed the grant agreement along with ACP Administrator/CEO Jorge L. Quijano. "As we near the completion of the Panama Canal Expansion, we are eager to explore new segments such as LNG, which are now possible given our enhanced capacity to accommodate longer and wider ships. This grant by the USTDA will build on plans and projects related to LNG that are already ongoing and will present us with the ability to evaluate additional market opportunities and client services for the benefit of the U.S.-Panama energy trade," ...

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LISCR: Detentions in the US increase

USCG has increased its scrutiny of pre-existing deficiencies The Republic of Liberia has issued Marine Advisory to warn on the increase of detentions in the USThe USCG has increased its scrutiny of pre-existing deficiencies that are not reported prior to a vessels arrival or at the time of initial port State boarding and where there is no evidence that corrective action has been initiated. The increased scrutiny is resulting in a significant increase in USCG detentions.If the USCG finds pre-existing deficiencies without first being notified by the Master and, if appropriate corrective action has not been initiated, they will assume the owner/Master intends to sail with the deficiencies un-addressed and will issue a detentionDetentions are avoidable, provided pre-existing deficiencies are reported and there is evidence that corrective action has been initiated. LISCR receive many pre-arrival check lists indicting all is in order, yet during PSC inspections equipment is not operating as required and such problems were preexisting and there is no evidence that corrective action has been taken.To avoid detention and delay of vessels schedule, LISCR advise owners, operators, DPA's to: Require Master's and crew to report all defective, inoperable equipment, system, etc., and ensure corrective action has been initiated, ...

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Natural gas as a fuel for US ships and shore-side operations

  On June 4, 2015, the US Federal Maritime Commission focused on the topic of liquified natural gas as a marine fuel. The meeting began with a presentation on the natural gas production and supply market. The floor was opened to all attendees to discuss issues regarding the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a marine fuel. The forum highlighted the substantial progress made by U.S.-based marine operators Harvey Gulf Marine, Totem Ocean Trailer Express, and Crowley Maritime who are transitioning to fueling their vessels with LNG. For U.S. operators, these retrofits and new builds take place exclusively in U.S. shipyards. International ocean carriers United Arab Shipping Company and Wallenius Wilhelmsen shared their deep-sea perspective on the choice of fuels. Wallenius Wilhelmsen heads up the Trident Alliance while United Arab Shipping Company has ordered seventeen LNG- ready vessels scheduled to be fully delivered by 2016, including one 14,000 TEU container ship, ten 15,000 TEU container ships and six 18,000+ TEU container vessels. Energy companies Sempra and Shell noted that natural gas will continue to become an important part of the global gas supply and called for continual infrastructure development. LNG America, a future natural gas bunker supplier, and design and service providers ...

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Call for study on the impact of derelict vessels

  US. Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA), and Representative Derek Kilmer (D-WA) led a bipartisan letter with a number of their colleagues calling for a formal study on the impact of derelict vessels to waterways and coastal communities. In a letter sent to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) led by Senator Cantwell, Representative Kilmer and Senator Wicker, the members urged the agency to conduct a review of how the U.S. is working to stop the threat derelict vessels pose to economies and the environment. Specifically, the Members called for a review of how the United States Coast Guard, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) address abandoned and derelict vessels. The U.S. currently lacks the information required to identify, track, and respond to derelict vessels. Early notification of abandoned vessels is key to protecting our nation’s waterways and preventing disasters that impact businesses, wildlife, and people who recreate and live in communities close to our lakes, rivers, and oceans. In the letter, the Senators and Members of Congress wrote: “Abandoned and derelict vessels pose a direct threat to both the safety of maritime navigation and natural resources.  Derelict vessels block waterways impacting marine transportation and ...

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Panama Canal Expansion to boost US container port traffic by 10%

According to BCG Report Image: East Coast Ports stand to gain 10% additional share of container traffic from East Asia to the US (Image Credit: BCG)Following the Panama Canal expansion in 2016, up to 10 percent of container traffic to the U.S. from East Asia could shift from West Coast ports to East Coast ports by 2020, according to new research conducted by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) andC.H. Robinson. Rerouting that volume is equivalent to building a port roughly double the size of the ports in Savannah and Charleston.The researchwhich involved extensive scenario analyses based on differing levels of demand, capacity, and costsis believed to be the most comprehensive public study of how the canals expansion will likely change the way cargo moves, by both water and land, into and within the U.S. The findings have been released in a report titledWide Open: How the Panama Canal Is Redrawing the Logistics Map.The $5 billion expansion will permanently alter the competitive balance between ports on the East and West coasts. With global container flows rising, West Coast ports will still handle more traffic than they do today, but they will experience lower growth rates and their market share will likely ...

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FMC: LNG bunkering is a potential market for U.S.

  On June 4, 2015, Commissioner William P. Doyle of the Federal Maritime Commission held a roundtable discussion at the suggestion of the Natural Gas Supply Association (NGSA).  Focusing on the topic of liquified natural gas as a marine fuel, Commissioner Doyle brought together a range of key government officials and industry stakeholders across the maritime, energy, transportation sectors. Commissioner Doyle stated, "LNG bunkering is a potential market for America’s natural gas resources. The Federal Maritime Commission’s mission is to foster a fair, efficient and reliable international ocean transportation system. By bringing elements of the maritime industry together with the energy sector, we are beginning a long-term dialogue that should culminate in greater understanding and use of domestic natural gas that is cost-efficient and with significant environmental compliance benefits." The forum highlighted the substantial progress made by U.S.-based marine operators Harvey Gulf Marine, Totem Ocean Trailer Express, and Crowley Maritime who are transitioning to fueling their vessels with LNG. For U.S. operators, these retrofits and new builds take place exclusively in U.S. shipyards. International ocean carriers United Arab Shipping Company and Wallenius Wilhelmsen shared their deep-sea perspective on the choice of fuels. Wallenius Wilhelmsen heads up the Trident Alliance while ...

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Tanker shipping's fortunes rest on US shale oil production

  How much US shale oil production is taken out of service will be a key driver of future tanker shipping earnings, according to the latest edition of the Tanker Forecaster, published by global shipping consultancy Drewry. Tanker operators are pinning their hopes on a rise in US crude oil imports as domestic shale oil extraction becomes increasingly unprofitable. Low oil prices have made crude extraction unprofitable for many US producers, leading to a fall in US rig counts and shrinking exploration and production investment. “Continued expansion of refinery capacity in Asia is likely to maintain growth in the global oil trade over the next five years,” said Rajesh Verma, Drewry’s tanker shipping lead analyst. “But demand from Asia alone will not be sufficient to sustain the improvement in tonnage utilisation. The only alternative source of growth is a recovery in US oil imports, especially when declining European refinery capacity will mean lower import volumes to EU countries.” Following two years of slow growth, the global trade in oil has accelerated over the past nine months due to increased stocking. And Drewry expects this trend to continue through to the end of 2016. However, thereafter we expect the influence of ...

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