ship engines

Main Engine Damage due to bunkered fuel quality

A General cargo ship “M” was involved in cargo operations in an Indonesian port. Charterers had arranged the vessel to receive bunkers by a local bunker barge. The barge moored alongside of the vessel for supplying the agreed amount of 155M/T of fuel oil (180cst) into No.1 & 2 F.O. tanks respectively.

Hidden engine room hot spots

Joe Maguire, Technical Manager at the Skuld P&I Club shared best practice with respect to the continued dangers of fires which originate in the machinery space and, specifically, as a result of a flammable liquid spraying onto a hot surface.

US Gulf contaminated bunkers can lead to engine damage

Contaminated IFO 380 bunkers in the US Gulf have resulted in a significant number of vessels experiencing system clogging and, in more extreme cases, engine damage, North Club warned. The contamination has been linked to the use of fuel oil cutter stock, a product added to residual fuels to reduce viscosity.

Swedish Club: Slower engines require less operating costs

The Swedish Club suggests vessel operators to always look to the long term, when deciding what type of engines to install across the fleet. Latest statistics from the Club show that vessels propelled by medium/high speed engines have a claims frequency 2.5 times higher than slow speed engines, with an average claims cost close to $650,000.

Poll

Does enclosed space entry need more regulation?

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