Monthly Safety Scenario

Sort by:

Filter by:



Casualties(58)Pollution(1)Safety(19)Security(1)

Tanker on anchorage runs aground because of a category 2 typhoon

In September’s monthly scenario, the Swedish club reports of a tanker that was run aground because of the typhoon. The vessel was anchored off an Asian port when a category 2 typhoon led to the wind increasing to more than Beaufort scale 12. The crew abandoned the vessel, while there were no injuries or pollution reported. 

Heavy weather leads to lost containers

The Swedish Club in its August monthly safety scenario focuses on a large container vessel that was sailing on a SE course in the North Atlantic, bound for a European port. While sailing the weather got worse and the wind reached Beaufort scale 9, resulting to 7-metre waves. The vessel was hit on its starboard side, causing heavy rolling. The maximum rolling was 20o to starboard and 30o to port.

Lessons learned: Stowaways enter steering gear trunk

In its latest Safety Scenario, the Swedish Club focuses on a case regarding three stowaways. Namely, the crew of a container ship that had left from Lagos discovered three people sitting on the rudder. The stowaways had used a small rowing boat to reach the vessel and had managed to climb up the rudder and then into the rudder trunk.

Lessons learned: Man overboard drill leaves crew member disabled

In its monthly safety scenario for May, the Swedish Club described a case of a serious injury during a man overboard drill, which left a crew member disabled for life. The Monthly Safety Scenario seeks to assist operators to comply with international safety regulations.

Lessons learned: Crack in cargo hold cover leads to wet damage

In its Monthly Safety Scenario for April, the Swedish Club describes a case of cargo damage caused by water ingress due to a crack on the hatch coaming. The incident resulted in several days of delay for the ship to get the wet cargo off the vessel, while most of the cargo was refused by the buyer.

High speed when approaching berth results to accidents

On its monthly safety scenario for January, the Swedish Club presents a case where a ro-ro vessel with high speed approached the berth in a port but was not able to carefully enter because of the wind, causing the vessel’s bulbous bow to hit the quay. The vessel was obliged to dry dock and repair the bulbous bow.

Officer forgets to insert a waypoint in GPS, ship runs aground

In its Monthly Safety Scenario for November, the Swedish P&I club analyzes a case of a ship grounding due to insufficient checking of the passage plan. When creating the passage plan, it is suggested that the plan is double checked by another officer to ensure all waypoints have been selected.

Lessons learned: Language attributed to ship grounding

In its Monthly Safety Scenario, the Swedish Club presents a case of ship grounding, discussing what can happen when someone communicates in a language that is not understood by everybody onboard. A pilot was communicating on the VHF with the VTS in Spanish and he did not clarify for the Master what he had said.

maritime events