maritime health

World Mental Health Day: Suicide of seafarers in the spotlight

Every 40 seconds, someone in the world loses their life to suicide, a figure which could justify a global interest in a greater awareness on mental health issues. On the occasion of the World Mental Health Day 2019 celebrated today, the World Health Organization sheds a focus on suicide prevention.

Building Resilience: Making connections

Good relationships with close family members, friends or others are important. Accepting help and support from those who care about you and will listen to you strengthens resilience. Some people find that being active in civic groups, faith-based organizations or other local groups provides social support and can help with reclaiming hope. Assisting others in their time of need also can benefit the helper.

Key parameters for controlling potable water quality onboard

An effective water management plan is vital for seafarers’ health onboard to ensure that the quality of the potable water follows all hygiene conditions. In this context, there are several important factors that need to be considered in terms of the quality of potable water onboard as well as its effective storage and distribution.

Building Resilience: Taking Decisive Action

Making decisions is a part of life; either at work place or home, during socializing and adverse situations, all individuals, either consciously or subconsciously, are asked to take decisions. These could be personal or professional, important, radical or with minimum effect to our daily life.

Building Resilience: Change is a part of life

Change is an inevitable part of life. It happens whether we’re ready or not. One of the secrets of living successfully is to learn to handle the changes coming our way. Resistance to acknowledge change is only a temporary band-aid to the situation awaiting us and it could ultimately pose negative results.

Oxygen Deficiency: The Silent Killer

Injury or death due to oxygen deficiency is a common hazard in the maritime industry. An oxygen-deficient atmosphere has less than 19.5% available oxygen (O2) and any atmosphere with less than 20.8 % oxygen should not be entered.

Procedures: How to maintain food hygiene onboard

A healthy food program provides seafarers with the required energy to perform their duties and fight any fatigue symptoms. On the other hand, if not handled properly, food onboard can be a significant cause of diseases. So how crews can ensure the food hygiene onboard? 

Emergency Procedures: Personnel injuries and illness when onboard

Being a seafarer is considered a challenging occupation especially when it comes to crew health and safety. Certainly, verifying seafarers’ health status prior embarkation is compelled. However, even if medical examinations are being conducted before seafarers join a ship, diseases owning to the nature of working onboard such as the cargo carried or the materials handled and even a few epidemic diseases are very common.

How to maintain a good housekeeping onboard

Good housekeeping is essential to a safe workplace onboard a vessel and housekeeping oversights rarely go unnoticed during port state control or vetting inspections, ISM audits and condition surveys. In view of this, the American Club listed general vessel housekeeping observations which could affect vessel safety.

Recognising mental health issues that affect crew

The UK P&I Club provides advice on how to spot the mental health signs among the crew onboard. A recent analysis revealed that anxiety, social isolation, pressure of work and disturbed sleep can affect crew, all of which can negatively affect crew of all ages, nationalities and ranks.

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