marine environment

Watch: Artificial reef to be installed underneath Sydney Opera House

A series of modular steel and concrete pods have been installed underwater around the Sydney Opera House to test the marine biodiversity improvement value of artificial structures. The initiative is a result of a three-year partnership between UTS, the Sydney Opera House and the NSW Government.

Clean Arctic Alliance calls for ban of HFO use in Iceland’s waters

In light of Iceland’s Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources decision, which bans the use of fuel oil with more than 0.1% sulphur content for ships operating in its territorial waters, Dr Sian Prior, Lead Advisor to the Clean Arctic Alliance, highlighted that the Alliance although supports this decision, they are in favour of generally banning HFO use and carriage as fuel.

Bermuda to protect 20% of its waters in marine protected areas

Bermuda will create an ocean plan to sustainably manage and improve ocean industries like fishing and tourism. It also aims to preserve 90,000 square kilometres of Bermuda’s waters in fully protected areas. In these areas, no fishing, extraction, or destruction of any kind will be allowed.

Watch: SAMSA ready for 2020 sulphur cap implementation

The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) announced that Africa is ready to implement the global regulations concerning the air pollution by vessels, according to IMO’s MARPOL convention. SAMSA’s acting CEO, Mr Sobantu Tilayi, focuses on the 2020 sulphur cap and Africa’s intention on fighting pollution and reducing shipping emissions.

Addressing underwater noise created by dredging

Underwater sound created by dredging equipment below the water surface can impact marine life and requires careful evaluation and monitoring, according to the International Association of Dredging Companies. Sound levels must be evaluated in relation to their possible effect on the specific marine fauna. The aim of evaluating underwater sound is to ensure a balance between the environmental impacts and socio-economic benefits of the dredging project.

5 marine species most affected by plastics

Up until 2050 the oceans will have more plastics that fish. Namely, thousands marine organisms die every year after swallowing too much plastics, or being trapped in them. However, there are five species that plastic pollution has affected the most. These are sea turtles, fish, seals, sea birds and whales.

Notation on reducing marine noise

RINA, the Italian Classification Society, focused on the matter of noise coming from vessels, as the majority of noise is emitted underwater, thus the public is unaware of the problem. Yet, marine noise results to the interference of animal’s ability to hear, having a huge impact the reproduction and survival of animals.

Poll

Should BWM training be a mandatory requirement?

maritime events