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Researchers find microplastics along the entire NSR

During an expedition in the Northern Sea Route, Russian researchers discovered microplastics all along the route, marking the first time ever that samples have been taken of microplastic waste along the route. The expected results will highlight the seriousness of marine pollution, addressing the matter that even some of the world’s most inaccessible oceans are impacted form pollution. 

About 75% of plastic bottles in sea come from China, report finds

The last 3 decades have seen an increase in plastic drink bottles, as they are the fastest growing form of pollution, in comparison to all debris types on remote Inaccessible Island; A newly-launched report notes that the rapid growth in Asian debris, mainly from China, coupled with the recent manufacture of these items, indicates that ships are responsible for most of the bottles floating in the central South Atlantic Ocean

GPS tracker helps collect 40 tonnes of plastic in Pacific Ocean

Sea pollution is increasing rapidly as ghost nets and plastic are seen travelling through the world’s oceans. Marine debris is hazardous not only for the the people making a living by the oceans, but also for the marine life. To save the oceans a California-based cargo ship named ‘Kwai’ collected 40 tonnes of plastics from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and docked in a Konolulu, Hawaii Harbour. 

Watch: Ocean Cleanup to test new system’s speed

Over the coming weeks, the Ocean Cleanup will perform several tests to slow down or speed up the system. At the initial stage, the team will start the first test to attempt slowing down the system. The latest version of this design, dubbed System 001/B, has arrived in the patch after eight days of transit.

Ocean Clean up begins operations in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Following the announcement made on June 24, that the Ocean Cleanup is ready to re-begin operations, it is ready to operate in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch this summer. The latest version of this design, dubbed System 001/B, has arrived in the patch after eight days of transit.

More microplastics are hidden in the ocean than the surface

The highest levels of microplastics are seen at more than 650 feet below the surface. Anela Choy, who studies the things that deep-sea creatures eat, has resulted to often studying plastics; Over the years, plastic would show up again and again in the stomachs of certain fish. She, then, realised that the plastic must be going down to them. 

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