injury onboard

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How to handle electrical injuries onboard

An electrical power failure onboard not only jeopardizes vessel’s safe operations but also may be linked to electrical hazards, putting at risk crew lives, especially electricians’ who are responsible to handle these systems onboard, and also personnel attempting electrical power connections during shipbuilding, ship repair or ship breaking.

Treating burns and scalds onboard

Seafarers should be very cautious when handling hot pipelines, steams and fires to avoid burns and scalds. Burns and scalds are damage to the skin caused by wet heat, electricity, or chemicals; both are treated in the same way while the amount of pain that the patient feels isn’t always related to how serious the burn is. Even a very serious burn may be relatively painless.

Tackling with eye injuries onboard

Regarding eye injuries, the first step in dealing with these is to record a full account of the circumstances of its occurrence followed by a careful eye examination. In order to prevent eye injuries, appropriate goggles or protective equipment should be worn while carrying shipboard jobs which pose great danger to the eyes of ship personnel (eg. welding, chipping, painting, and working with hazardous material such as oil, chemicals etc.).

Occupational injuries due to vibrating tools or machinery

Hand-arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) is the medical term for symptoms caused by vibration damages that may occur in the fingers, hands and arms due to the use of vibrating tools or machinery. Previously, it was known as ‘vibration white finger’, however the name is changed to HAVS to reflect additional symptoms.

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