Monday, December 6, 2021

Tag: IMO

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Tank entry guidelines when using nitrogen as an inerting medium

Guidelines on tank entry for tankers using nitrogen The IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 99), in considering the approval of the revised 'Recommendations for entering enclosed spaces aboard ships' as completed by the Sub-committee on Dangerous Goods, Solid Cargoes and Containers (DSC), also considered the circular on 'Guidelines on tank entry for tankers using nitrogen as an inerting medium' developed by the Sub-committee on Bulk Liquids and Gases (BLG).The Committee considered two documents, MSC 89/11/2 by Argentina and MSC 89/11/3 by Norway, INTERTANKO, OCIMF, IFSMA, ITF, NI and BIMCO which essentially proposed that these guidelines should be combined into one single guideline.It was proposed, in MSC 89/11/3, that the use of nitrogen in this context is not exclusive to tankers (it is also used on bulk carriers, gas carriers and offshore supply vessels) and therefore combining the guidelines into one guideline would ensure the widest possible availability and applicability, and would not be lost on seafarers who do not serve on tankers.It was also proposed that the principal issue should be that of precautions before entering enclosed spaces, and not what is within the enclosed space, as the latter would give the impression that some enclosed spaces could be more ...

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Guidelines for the Evaluation and Replacement of Lifeboat Release and Retrieval Systems

A milestone has been reached Readers will remember from previous articles that INTERTANKO is a member of the Industry Lifeboat Group (ILG), which was instrumental in the creation of the "Proposed Guidelines for the Evaluation and Replacement of Lifeboat Release and Retrieval Systems".At this week's meetings of the IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 89), the Committee:- approved the draft MSC circular on Guidelines for Evaluation and Replacement of Lifeboat Release and Retrieval Systems;- adopted the modified amendments to SOLAS regulation III/1;- approved the draft MSC circular on early application of new SOLAS regulation III/1.5;- adopted the modified amendments to the LSA Code and decided on their application date;- adopted the draft MSC resolution on amendments to the Revised recommendation on testing of life-saving appliances (resolution MSC.81 (70)), as amended.INTERTANKO voiced its support for the proposed Guidelines in Plenary. However, like other members of the ILG and many Member States, INTERTANKO was of the opinion that it would be premature to close-out the lifeboat release hook topic in its entirety. The ILG has identified several elements which have not been addressed in the proposed Guidelines:- Vibration;- Secondary safety systems.The ILG recognises that vibration can potentially be a major factor in the ...

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IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee meets for its 89th session

Piracy high on the Agenda Piracy and armed robbery against ships off the coast of Somalia and in the Gulf of Aden and the wider Indian Ocean will be high on the agenda when IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) meets at the Organization's London Headquarters for its 89th session from 11 to 20 May 2011.The busy agenda also includes adoption of amendments, concerning lifeboat release hooks, to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and work related to the implementation of the Torremolinos Protocol on fishing vessel safety, as well as goal-based standards for vessel construction and the long-range identification and tracking of ships. The MSC will also consider the approval of a number of draft resolutions for submission to the IMO Assembly, to be held in late 2011.Piracy and armed robbery against ships to be discussedThe MSC is expected to discuss the development of guidance on the employment of private, armed security service providers on board ships; measures to improve compliance with the Best Management Practices to Deter Piracy off the Coast of Somalia and in the Arabian Sea area; and proposed guidelines to assist in the collection of evidence after a hijack.The number of ...

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Shipping is increasingly subject to environmental pressure

For many the environmental rules set by the IMO are seen as a minimum standard There is more to environmental compliance than operating a vessel in accordance with whatever rule has come from the International Maritime Organization.Shipping is increasingly subject to commercial environmental pressure as other companies focus on their own supply chain performance and expect their suppliers to do the same.For many organisations the environmental rules that have been set by the IMO are seen as a minimum standard, and owners hoping to sound like they have a sound environmental stewardship by stating their vessels are in full compliance and by increasingly sounding like they are in fact doing the minimum needed.The development of commercial and social pressures comes as the shipping industry faces a make or break year. The IMO is hoping to get its design index sorted out and made mandatory and to develop a market-based measure. These are the two mandatory tools it hopes will demonstrate movement in tackling CO2 emissions from shipping.

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Guidelines for evaluation and replacement of lifeboat-retrieval systems

All non complying appliances will have to be replaced Shipowners are pushing for guidelines on additional safety measures for lifeboat-securing systems following an agreement on evaluating and replacing the old-design onload release hooks that have led to dozens of fatal accidents in safety drills.Last month, at thedesign and equipment meeting at the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) agreed guidelines for the evaluation and replacement of lifeboat-retrieval systems.It also agreed amendments to the Life-Saving Appliances (LSA) Code that will introduce extra safety arrangements to prevent the unintended release of lifeboats.Under the new regulation, all appliances not complying with the amended LSA Code will have to be replaced.

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Shipping focuses on environmental rules

Movements to tackle CO2 emissions from shipping There is more to environmental compliance than operating a vessel in accordance with whatever rule has come from the International Maritime Organization.Shipping is increasingly subject to commercial environmental pressure as other companies focus on their own supply chain performance and expect their suppliers to do the same.For many organisations the environmental rules that have been set by the IMO are seen as a minimum standard, and owners hoping to sound like they have a sound environmental stewardship by stating their vessels are in full compliance are increasingly sounding like they are in fact doing the minimum needed.The development of commercial and social pressures comes as the shipping industry faces a make or break year. The IMO is hoping to get its design index sorted out and made mandatory and to develop a market-based measure.These are the two mandatory tools it hopes will demonstrate movement in tackling CO2 emissions from shipping.

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Potential costs of retrofitting ballast water treatment systems

Installation numbers are low Solutions have extensively covered ballast water treatment systems over the years but with the IMO Ballast Water Convention still not ratified, installation numbers have been low.When the time comes for existing vessels to be fitted there is a chance that some obstacles may be encountered. The IMO Ballast Water Convention is a well-known feature of the legislative landscape in the shipping sector.Less well appreciated are some of the technical complications and potential costs of retrofitting ballast water treatment systems.

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Revision of IMO Circular Letter 3175 Rev1

Navigation in the sea area surrounding Japan The IMO Circular Letter No. 3175 Rev1 - Subject: Navigation in the sea area surrounding Japan in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011 - issued on 1 April 2011 has been revised.Revision 2 advisesthat on 12 April 2011, the accident assessment was revised from Level 5 to Level 7 following updated information regarding the estimated amounts of radioactive material discharged to the atmosphere. Radiation monitoring around airports and seaports in Japan continues to confirm that levels remain well within safe limits from a health perspective.In addition, monitoring of passengers, crew and cargo from Japan carried out to date in other countries, in accordance with national policies, does not suggest health or safety risks. Therefore, screening for radiation at airports and seaports around the world for health and safety purposes is currently considered unnecessary.To view Circular Letter No. 3175 Rev2 click hereSource : IMO

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