HFO

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PPR 6 starts discussions with focus on 2020 sulphur cap

IMO’s Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response meets this week, from 18 to 22 February at IMO headquarters. The meeting will focus on finalizing draft Guidelines on the implementation of the 0.50% sulphur limit under MARPOL Annex VI. The Guidelines aim to help the preparations for uniform implementation of the lower limit for sulphur content in ships’ fuel oil.

Clean Arctic Alliance: PPR 6 must focus on Arctic HFO ban

As the meeting of IMO’s Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR 6) opens today in London, the Clean Arctic Alliance called on Member States to give emphasis to the target of establishing a ban on the use and carriage of heavy fuel oil by shipping in the Arctic. The actual adoption of the ban is expected to take place on 2021, with the industry making its decision on what fuels it will use during 2022. The ban will apply in 2023.

Infographic: The story of Arctic HFO ban so far

Due to the important risks around HFO, the international shipping community banned its use and carriage by ships around Antarctica in 2011. To describe the process of what have been done and what will be done in the future, the Clean Arctic Alliance published an infographic. A ban on HFO in the Arctic was considered in 2013 during the deliberations on the IMO Polar Code.

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises to stop using HFO

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises announced that it will use low-sulphur Marine Gas Oil on all expedition ships from July 2020. Currently, the company is using MGO in particularly vulnerable areas like the Arctic, Antarctica and Kamchatka. The routes will be managed on the basis an eco-efficient average speed, which aims to reduce fuel consumption by one third.

Polar Code, two years on: What’s next?

Is Polar Code enough to ensure safety & environmental protection of seafarers, passengers and Arctic people? The majority (74%) of the participants in a quick SAFETY4SEA Poll replied no, while just 26% are satisfied with the application of the Code. But what lies behind this negative perception toward Polar Code?

Trials for world’s first zero emission, ‘drop in’ HFO completed

GoodFuels Marine along with bulker and tanker owner and operator Norden A/S, has successfully completed trials of the world’s first zero emission, ‘drop in’ Heavy Fuel Oil. The Bio-Fuel Oil is able to deliver almost zero carbon and Sulphur Oxide emissions without requiring engine modifications.

MEPC 73 marks progress towards Arctic HFO ban

MEPC 73, which concluded on Friday, considered impact assessment methodology ahead of sending the ‘Scope of Work’- which sets out the work to be done to reduce the risks associated with the use and carriage of HFO by ships in Arctic, including the proposal for a ban, to PPR6 in February.

Focus on Arctic HFO ban ahead of MEPC 73

As the MEPC 73 starts today in London, the Clean Arctic Alliance calls the member states to reaffirm their commitment towards a ban on the use and carriage of polluting heavy fuel oil from Arctic shipping from 2021. At MEPC 72 most of IMO members agreed in principle to this ban.

Report: Switching to clean fuel in Arctic costs a glass of wine

It would cost passengers just the price of a glass of wine a day if cruise ships would stop burning HFO in the fragile Arctic, according to a new report from T&E. The report resulted from analysis of the impact on the cruise ship ‘MS Rotterdam’ had it switched to MGO, during three summer trips to the Arctic.

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