Cape Town Agreement

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Finland joins Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety

Finland is the latest country to join the Cape Town Agreement concerning fishing vessel safety, in efforts to bring mandatory safety measures for fishing vessels of 24 m in length and over. The treaty will be enforced one year after at least 22 states, with an aggregate 3,600 fishing vessels of 24 meters in length and over operating on the high seas have expressed their consent to be bound by it.

Cook Islands, Sao Tome and Principles join fishing vessel safety treaty

The Cook Islands and Sao Tome and Principles are the latest states to join the Cape Town Agreement in efforts to bring mandatory safety measures for fishing vessels of 24 m in length and over. The states support the implementation of safety measures for the fishing sector in efforts to better protect those working in the industry.

IMO to boost safety of ships and fishing in Ghana

Fishing is considered one of the most dangerous occupations in the world and, in spite of improvements in technology, the loss of life in the fisheries sector is unacceptably high.  In order to improve the safety of fishers and fishing vessels, IMO has established, over the years, various initiatives, culminating with the adoption of the Cape Town Agreement of 2012.

Spain accedes to Cape Town Agreement for fishing safety

Spain has become the latest country to accede to IMO’s Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety, significantly boosting the number of vessels needed for entry into force. The entry into force of the 2012 Cape Town Agreement is expected to result in fewer accidents, and a more effective infrastructure for monitoring illegal fishing.

IMO, Pew Charitable Trust raise awareness for Cape Town Agreement

IMO has collaborated with the NGO ‘Pew Charitable Trust’, to organise a series of seminars for government officials and industry representatives in key developing countries, to raise awareness of the Cape Town Agreement and the benefits of ratifying it. The Cape Town Agreement addresses fishing vessel safety.

How can the Cape Town Agreement improve fishing sector

The ILO estimated in 1999 that 24,000 people die every year in the fishing sector, an amount 10 times more than merchant ships. However, fishing vessels are excluded from almost all international maritime regulations. The 2012 Cape Town Agreement wants to stop that and outlines fishing vessel standards.

IMO: Cape Town Agreement ratification to ensure fishing vessels safety

‘​IMO’s Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety needs to be ratified and implemented in order to save fishers’ lives,’ was IMO’s key message during the UN COFI 2018 in Rome,on 9-13 July. The Agreement currently has 10 Contracting States, but needs 22 for entry into force.

South Africa signs up to IMO treaty on fishing vessel personnel

South Africa has become the 25th State to sign up to the IMO treaty on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel Personnel (STCW-F). The Convention sets the certification and minimum training requirements for crews of seagoing fishing vessels of 24 metres in length and above.

Fishers fatalities give impetus to fishing vessel safety work

Although exact figures are hard to come by, preliminary estimates of fatalities in fishing are now over 32,000 people annually. These figures provided the background to talks at the Fifth International Fishing Industry Safety & Health Conference (iFish5), on 10–13 June, in St. John’s, Canada.

France accedes to fishing vessel safety treaty

In an effort to increase global fishing vessel safety, France became the ninth State to ratify IMO’s Cape Town Agreement. The treaty covers various important safety requirements including radiocommunications, life-saving appliances and arrangements, emergency procedures, musters and drills.

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