Through their collaboration, both sides want a significant share of sea-going vessels to ‘plug in’ once they have moored along one of the port’s quays, by 2030.

This will allow them to power down their diesel generators while berthed – good news for local air quality and the vessels’ carbon footprint.

In light of the situation, Allard Castelein, CEO of the Port of Rotterdam Authority commended:

Our vision combines ambition and pragmatism. We will be setting up eight to ten shore-based power projects for a variety of sea-going vessel types. We will be doing this in partnership with companies in the port area and with the shipping companies that use our port. We will continually monitor the results of these projects to learn whether we can speed up the process or need to take a bit more time.

What is more, during the next five years, the partners will be initiating a series of projects that are intended to accelerate and scale up the adoption of shore-based power.

Depending on the experiences gained in these projects, the Municipality and the Port Authority may adapt their targets in this area in 2025.

The plan is a major step forward for sustainability in the port. ‘Shore-based power allows us to connect vessels to a clean source of power. This prevents both air pollution and noise nuisance – which will improve conditions for local residents and for the surrounding nature areas. Our port will once again become a bit greener.

... Arno Bonte, Rotterdam’s Vice Mayor for Sustainability, Clean Air and Energy Transition concluded.