Over time, it was learned that the use of short, easily remembered names in written as well as spoken communications is quicker and reduces confusion when two or more tropical storms occur at the same time,

...the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration explained.

In 1953, the United States began using female names for storms and, by 1978, both male and female names were used to identify Northern Pacific storms. This was then adopted in 1979 for storms in the Atlantic basin.

Storms are given short, distinctive names to avoid confusion and streamline communications.

NOAA’s National Hurricane Center does not control the naming of tropical storms.

Instead, there is a strict procedure established by the World Meteorological Organization. For Atlantic hurricanes, there is a list of male and female names which are used on a six-year rotation.

The only time that there is a change is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate.

In the event that more than 21 named tropical cyclones occur in a season, any additional storms will take names from the Greek alphabet, NOAA said.