To remind, the goal of the Ocean-Going Vessels At Berth Regulation is set to reduce diesel particulate matter (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from ocean-going vessels auxiliary engines while they are docked at California ports.

Namely, the rule requires container, passenger and refrigerated cargo ships to reduce emissions while docked at California’s busiest ports, including Los Angeles, Long Beach, Oakland, Hueneme, San Francisco and San Diego.

In fact, the violations were discovered during routine audits of the company’s 2017 and 2018 vessel fleet visits to the Port of Oakland.

According to CARB’s investigation, from 2017 to 2018 Mitsui O.S.K. Line’s Oakland fleet did not meet the three-hour diesel engine operational time limits, and did not reduce auxiliary engine power generation by 70% as is required.

Emissions from ships pollute communities adjacent to the Port, and also contribute to smog. This regulation requiring shipping fleets to reduce their diesel emissions while at berth has a profound impact on helping clean up air quality, especially in communities located near ports.

...said CARB Executive Officer Richard Corey.

In light of the situation, MOL agreed to pay $253,300 to the Air Pollution Control Fund to support efforts to improve air quality, and to comply with all applicable CARB regulations.