SAFETY4SEA https://safety4sea.com Maritime News Wed, 20 Nov 2019 15:42:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.7 Germany applauds Rotterdam’s carbon-neutral plan amid trade relations https://safety4sea.com/germany-applauds-rotterdams-carbon-neutral-plan-amid-trade-relations/ https://safety4sea.com/germany-applauds-rotterdams-carbon-neutral-plan-amid-trade-relations/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 15:32:03 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209583 The German business community paid a visit to the port of Rotterdam applauding its efforts on becoming CO2-neutral in three steps; The port of Rotterdam has crucial business relations with Germany, given that a quarter of the freight throughput in the Port of Rotterdam is destined for Germany. 

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The German business community paid a visit to the port of Rotterdam applauding its efforts on becoming CO2-neutral in three steps; The port of Rotterdam has crucial business relations with Germany, given that a quarter of the freight throughput in the Port of Rotterdam is destined for Germany. 

Specifically, a delegation from Bundesverband der Deutschen Industrie (BDI) comprised 15 participants. The attendees welcomed the port's plans on achieving a greener and more sustainable environment, as Germany, Europe's biggest economy, imports ores, coal, oil and minerals as well as parts for industry via Rotterdam.

Additionally, Germany and port of Rotterdam are linked through the Rhine, Neckar and Main rivers form a sustainable and efficient connection.

The Port of Rotterdam handles the challenge of climate protection in a consistent and pragmatic manner. The decarbonization of this logistical global hub, that is central to German industry, is exemplary.

...said BDI delegation leader Holger Lösch.

The Port of Rotterdam and the German employers, both shared their interests in growing infrastructure capacity on rail freight and their mutual goals in which they both benefit.

We should be proud that the leading role that Rotterdam is taking in the energy transition is being recognised by our partners in Germany. This can only work to strengthen the long-standing and extremely important links between Rotterdam and the German hinterland.

...added Stijn van Els, delegation leader on behalf of the Port of Rotterdam Authority.

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Egypt’s Sokhna port is near expansion completion https://safety4sea.com/egypts-sokhna-port-is-near-expansion-completion/ https://safety4sea.com/egypts-sokhna-port-is-near-expansion-completion/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 15:14:58 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209603 DP World Sokhna celebrates its 10th anniversary by announcing that its expansion project, that will bring to Egypt $1.6 billion, is near completion and will begin operations during the second quarter of 2020. The port expansion will boost the port's capacity to 1.75 million TEUs per year.

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DP World Sokhna celebrates its 10th anniversary by announcing that its expansion project, that will bring to Egypt $1.6 billion, is near completion and will begin operations during the second quarter of 2020.

The port expansion will boost the port's capacity to 1.75 million TEUs per year.

The port expansion is ideal for the port's position, as it serves as a major gateway for Egypt's trade, while it is Egypt's only port that is capable of handling the largest container ships in the world.

The project costed $250 million and included two operational basins, the expansion into Basin 2 includes a 1.3-kilometre-long quay with 400 meters in use in Phase 1, and a 350,000 square meter container yard.

The project is taking place at a time when the UAE and Egypt agreed to support a $20 billion-joint strategic platform to invest in a range of vital sectors and assets. Now, Basin 1 is already operating with a capacity of 945,000 TEUs; Basin 3 is a liquid bulk station spanning 400 square meters which is a major gateway for Egypt’s energy imports.

Suhail Al Banna, CEO and Managing Director of DP World Middle East and Africa commented

We are confident that our expansion into Basin 2 will significantly facilitate greater volume capacity at the port, which in turn, supports our commitment to bolstering Egypt’s economic growth by attracting greater investment and strengthening the foundations for a lucrative trade eco-system.

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New waste collector to address pollution in rivers https://safety4sea.com/new-waste-collector-to-address-pollution-in-rivers/ https://safety4sea.com/new-waste-collector-to-address-pollution-in-rivers/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 15:09:23 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209601 A new system currently being tested by Norway's Environmental Agency in the Akers river in Oslo seeks to tackle waste pollution issues in rivers.  Key pollution sources for rivers are domestic wastes from households and sewage, as well as disposal of plastic bags, plastic objects and solid wastes.

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A new system currently being tested by Norway's Environmental Agency in the Akers river in Oslo seeks to tackle waste pollution issues in rivers. Pollution is main area of concern for rivers. Key pollution sources for rivers are domestic wastes from households and sewage, as well as disposal of plastic bags, plastic objects and solid wastes.

The system, dubbed Trash Trawl, is produced by the Norwegian company SpillTech, specializing in oil spill recovery equipment and systems to collect waste in ports.

Many rivers are becoming increasingly polluted, so it is important to collect as much waste as possible and that is the reason why we have developed a new waste collector system,

...says Trond Lindheim, managing director of SpillTech.

As explained, the system works on the high-speed boom principle that is common in oil spill recovery.

The system uses a boom system that feeds floating garbage to a meshed net, which is emptied two to four times on a weekly basis.

An important aspect of the development work has been to ensure that the equipment is easy to handle, and yet robust enough to withstand adverse river conditions, according to Lindheim.

The company is currently in talks with local government agencies and international organisations to explore further applications of the new system.

Maritime industry loses an estimated €235 million a year from marine plastic debris, while the fishing sector loses close to €138 million per year from plastic pollution, according to a WWF report released earlier in 2019. The report reveals that maritime trade and fisheries are responsible for 20% of plastics at sea.

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World’s first hybrid surface crew transfer vessel to be launched https://safety4sea.com/worlds-first-hybrid-surface-crew-transfer-vessel-to-be-launched/ https://safety4sea.com/worlds-first-hybrid-surface-crew-transfer-vessel-to-be-launched/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 14:46:22 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209594 Cwind deployed Wight Shipyard Co (WSC) to build the world's first hybrid surface effect crew transfer vessel, which is to operate Borssele 1 and 2 offshore windfarms located 23 kilometres off the Dutch coast in mid-2020.

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Cwind deployed Wight Shipyard Co (WSC) to build the world's first hybrid surface effect crew transfer vessel, which is to operate Borssele 1 and 2 offshore windfarms located 23 kilometres off the Dutch coast in mid-2020.

WSC will construct the project from its development stage until its delivery.

The vessel will be equipped with the Hybrid SES propulsion engine, providing it with a sprint speed and extreme bollard push from its 1,600 kW installed diesel engines, which can be battery boosted up to 1,500 kW. Moreover, the vessel will be fuel efficient by balancing engine and inefficient low engine power running hours, with battery drive modes including windfarm standby and low speed/harbour operations.

This technology will result to an engine operating reduction of 50% during windfarm battery standby.

Peter Morton, CEO WSC commented

We have built a reputation in the fast ferry arena and commercial marine sector. But this a world first, building a hybrid SES for crew transfer. Building greener vessels has been an integral focus for some time now so we are well placed to lead this step change in Crew Transfer Vessels.

Moreover, the crew transfer vessel was develop by the operator CWind and ESNA, a ship design company based in Kristiansand, Norway.

The Hybrid SES crew transfer vessel will operate from the Dutch port of Vlissingen to Borssele 1 and 2, located 23 km from the Dutch coast in the North Sea.

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Revised strategy suggested for Gulf of Mexico Shallow Water strandings https://safety4sea.com/revised-strategy-suggested-for-gulf-of-mexico-shallow-water-strandings/ https://safety4sea.com/revised-strategy-suggested-for-gulf-of-mexico-shallow-water-strandings/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 14:44:39 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209580 New research from the US BSEE and BOEM indicates the need to define the Gulf of Mexico Shallow Water Province (water depth less than 200 meters) as a distinct province to avoid stranding more than $20 billion of the US oil and natural gas resources.

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New research from the US Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) indicates the need to define the Gulf of Mexico Shallow Water Province (water depth less than 200 meters) as a distinct province to avoid stranding more than $20 billion of the US oil and natural gas resources.

The Shallow Water Province is a historically energy-rich area, accounting for 33% of the Gulf’s natural gas production and just over 10% of its oil production.

Production and infrastructure investment used to be substantially higher in the Shallow Water Province, but over the last 20 years, development has moved onshore or to deepwater operations.

The number of wells drilled has decreased 89% over the last 10 years, and approximately 100 platforms a year are being removed with no new platforms being installed.

If this trend continues, the lack of development will potentially strand 179 million barrels of oil and 4,567 billion cubic feet of natural gas that have an estimated worth of $20 billion.

As such, the joint report, “Gulf of Mexico Data and Analysis/ Leasing, Drilling and Production, Gulf of Mexico Shallow Water Potential Stranded Assets,” supporting Trump’s EOs 13795, 13868 and 13783 of promoting offshore energy infrastructure, independence and economic growth, evaluates the contributing factors for this decline and recommends using an updated discount rate for the two distinct provinces.

This research provides critical information that energy development in the Gulf of Mexico should not be managed with a ‘one size fits all’ approach in how we avoid stranding our nation’s valuable energy resources. Although reversing the natural decline may not be entirely possible, promoting the recovery of the remaining oil and natural gas resources in the Gulf of Mexico Shallow Water Province, while protecting the interests of the American public, is an obligation this administration is taking action on,

...said BSEE Director Scott Angelle.

The research has laid the groundwork for two actions that encourage increased activity in the province. They include:

  • BOEM’s publication of updated discount rates for the two distinct provinces of the Gulf of Mexico; namely, the Shallow Water Province and the Deepwater Province (the discount rate for the Deepwater Province also applies to all other OCS areas that that will be used for BSEE’s special case royalty relief evaluations); and
  • verification that BSEE has authority to consider applications for royalty relief on a “per project” basis. These projects can include exploratory wells in order to promote development of discovered resources.

The updated discounted rate for the Shallow Water Province will apply to special case royalty relief applications and will only be applicable for new wells and production in the region.

Drilling in the shallow waters of the Gulf of Mexico has plummeted to the point that $20 billion in oil and gas could be abandoned. This hurts workers across the state, from Houma to Cameron. The research released today will help us develop an attack plan that will increase interest in the shallow waters and protect jobs,

...said Louisiana Senator John Kennedy.

Additionally, the report concludes that when investment increases activity in the province, there are ancillary benefits for the province, region, and country.

According to BOEM, for every million-dollar investment in shallow water, the total economic impact, including the reinvestment of state and local taxes, yields approximately $1.7 to $2 million in additional economic activity.

See also:

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Port LA and Malmö Port AB agree on environmental partnership https://safety4sea.com/port-la-and-malmo-port-ab-agree-on-environmental-partnership/ https://safety4sea.com/port-la-and-malmo-port-ab-agree-on-environmental-partnership/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 14:26:49 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209590 The Port of Los Angeles signed a five-year MoU with Copenhagen Malmö Port AB (CMP), partnering on sustainability and environmental issues, focusing on information and knowledge sharing and boost of energy use and alternative energy sources.

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The Port of Los Angeles signed a five-year MoU with Copenhagen Malmö Port AB (CMP), partnering on sustainability and environmental issues, focusing on information and knowledge sharing and boost of energy use and alternative energy sources.

Specifically, the MoU was signed on November 15 at the port of Los Angeles.

Accordingly, the collaboration includes sharing of best practices between the two partners, advance clean marine terminal equipment technology, ocean-going vessels and drayage trucks and involvement in global environmental associations and initiatives.

Gene Seroka, Executive Director of the Port of Los Angeles stated

This agreement further solidifies our partnership with CMP, and our mutual interest in promoting the most efficient, most sustainable goods movement possible. With cooperative information-sharing among ports around the world, the Port of Los Angeles has been able to achieve many of our advancements in reducing environmental impacts from port operations over the last decade.

In addition, Barbara Scheel Agersnap, CEO of CMP  noted that to achieve greater energy efficiency, it is important for new technologies and innovative ways of working to emerge.

The port of LA recently issued a report about highlighting that tariffs have a negative impact on jobs, income and tax revenue, also affected from the ongoing trade war between the US and China.

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Nautilus reports on safeguarding the British maritime sector https://safety4sea.com/nautilus-reports-on-safeguarding-the-british-maritime-sector/ https://safety4sea.com/nautilus-reports-on-safeguarding-the-british-maritime-sector/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 14:17:44 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209532 Nautilus International issued the Nautilus Manifesto for the UK election 2019 for safeguarding the British maritime sector in terms of UK seafarers, British shipping, maritime safety and defense. Nautilus stresses that “if the UK is to retain a shipping industry that sustains the country’s global trading requirements and underpins the nation’s continued global lead as a maritime services center, much more needs to be done,” adding that "Britain needs ships and seafarers – perhaps more now than ever before. We live in a complex global economy and maritime trade is of fundamental importance."

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Nautilus International issued the Nautilus Manifesto for the UK election 2019 for safeguarding the British maritime sector in terms of UK seafarers, British shipping, maritime safety and defense.

Nautilus stresses that “if the UK is to retain a shipping industry that sustains the country’s global trading requirements and underpins the nation’s continued global lead as a maritime services center, much more needs to be done,” adding that

 Britain needs ships and seafarers – perhaps more now than ever before. We live in a complex global economy and maritime trade is of fundamental importance.

UK Seafarers

In fact, the report highlights that the UK’s maritime interests have continued to suffer deep and dramatic decline, despite the government’s attempts to develop a strategic and long-term vision for the sector through the Maritime Growth Study and the Maritime 2050 initiative.

Moreover, Nautilus adds that the number of British seafarers is expected to fall by around a further one-third over the next decade due to the current gap between numbers due to retire and numbers of new entrants, amount to a further 30% decline to be expected within the next decade.

Nautilus underlines whatsoever, that there is no shortage of young people wishing to embark on a maritime career, as applications for cadetships and ratings apprenticeships far outstripping the number of vacancies.

In the post-Brexit environment, “the government must develop proactive policies to maximize the employment of British seafarers in the UK.” Thus, Nautilus proposes that the government can

  • Invest in maritime education and training, aiming to build capacity, future proof seafarer skills, and further to develop state-of-the-art equipment and technology
  • Increase investment in the Support for Maritime Training (SMarT) scheme to cover 100% of the cost of training UK-resident seafarers and further require a commitment from employers to guarantee a period of employment on completion of a cadetship
  • Support the employment of UK-resident seafarers by introducing stricter controls over the issue of work permits, visas and UK Certificates of Equivalent Competency (CECs)
  • promote collective bargaining, the application of the National Minimum Wage to all seafarers serving in UK waters including one-port voyages, and the active enforcement of Maritime Labour Convention requirements onboard all visiting vessels
  • Enhance the employment of British seafarers, especially in coastal shipping; passenger and in domestic and intra-European freight ferry services; the offshore renewables sector; and in offshore oil and gas exploration and decommissioning

British shipping

The UK must ensure that it can compete against flag states with more interventionist policies, as well as against the flag states that seek to grow by offering low-cost, low standard and ‘light touch’ regulatory regimes.

Countries with substantial maritime subsidies could benefit from a systemic review of their subsidies, with support measures linked more clearly to the delivery of identified policy goals, such as employment and training, flag links, national security, and environmental performance.

Nautilus believes there is significant scope for the UK to conduct such a review of its support measures – including Tonnage Tax and Support for Maritime Training. A review could examine the way in which countries outside the EU have gone above and beyond tonnage tax to develop policy programme to attract ships to their registers and grow their skills base.

Nautilus proposes the

  • Enforcement of a 'genuine link' requirement for ships on the UK Ship Register as required under the United Nationals Convention of the Law of the Sea 1986
  • Encouragement of British shipowners who use foreign flags to return to the UKSR and end support for the Red Ensign Group (REG), as these flags present significant unfair competition to the UKSR
  • Examination of the scope for ‘cabotage’ protection of domestic trades in order to increase economic output and create jobs
  • Establishment of a national maritime strategy which responds to the maritime skills crisis and establishment of economic and strategic transport needs of the nation
  • Improvement of the UK Tonnage Tax scheme

Maritime safety

Nautilus then notes that the waters around the UK are some of the busiest and most dangerous in the world, underlining that maritime expertise is essential for many critical safety positions.

It is added that the continuous decline in the size of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) has seriously depleted the Ministry of Defense’s (MoD) ability to rely upon British merchant ships and seafarers for vital operational tasks and delivering humanitarian aid.

Nautilus adds that policies should recognize the vital role of seafarers in safe shipping and reflect the need to protect their wellbeing and advises to

  • Increase staffing and resources for the Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA), to ensure it can cope with the demands placed upon it and to maintain high standards of inspection
  • Take proactive efforts to secure better enforcement of international maritime safety regulations and conventions, to include more effective action against shipping companies violating global standards
  • Reverse the cuts in UK Emergency Towing Vessel provision, and reinstate government support for the maritime element of the Confidential Hazardous Incident Reporting Programme (CHIRP)
  • Eradicate fatigue amongst seafarers including the abolition of six-on/six-off work patterns

Defence

Lastly, the decline in the number of UK-registered ships and the number of UK seafarers presents serious questions about the future ability of the nation to maintain supply lines and support British military operations.

The government can therefore:

  • Invest in the RFA to provide the fleet size and seafarer numbers needed to support the Royal Navy, and provide humanitarian relief and various maritime security responsibilities worldwide
  • Reverse the cuts in the UK’s strategic ro-ro sealift capacity
  • Support the Britannia Maritime Aid proposals for a specially designed multi-purpose vessel to provide additional support for humanitarian aid and disaster relief operations – with a dual role as a state-of-the art mobile training center

Earlier in October, Nautilus International has welcomed a reduction in risk levels by the UK for vessels transiting the Strait of Hormuz. Namely, on November 7 the Warlike Operations Area Committee (WOAC) agreed to downgrade the Strait of Hormuz from a High-Risk Area.

Namely, Nautilus general secretary Mark Dickinson welcomed this decision, highlighting that the safety and security of seafarers was of 'utmost importance to the Union.'

To explore more about the Nautilus Manifesto, you can click on the PDF bellow.

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Five US offshore companies propose offshore wind project https://safety4sea.com/five-us-offshore-companies-propose-offshore-wind-project/ https://safety4sea.com/five-us-offshore-companies-propose-offshore-wind-project/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 14:12:23 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209452 Five U.S. offshore wind companies, made their recommendation to the U.S coast (USCG), in order to adopt a uniform layout of wind turbines, placed at north to south columns and east to west rows. The project goals to offer safer navigational corridors to fishermen or other maritime users, when passing through one area to the other.

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Five U.S. offshore wind companies made their recommendation to the US Coast Guard(USCG), in order to adopt a uniform layout of wind turbines, placed at north to south columns and east to west rows. The project goals to offer safer navigational corridors to fishermen or other maritime users, when passing through one area to the other.

Spaced one nautical mile apart, all the turbines will allow a safer transmit from one point of the New England's wind energy area to the other. "This 1x1 nm layout has been confirmed through expert analysis to allow for safe navigation without the need for additional designated transit lanes" said the members of the association, while they noted that the wide spacing between structures will aid to accommodate search and rescue operations

According to the wind companies, the project of the uniform layout came after the several requests they've received from fishing interests and stakeholders in meetings. Namely, behind the turbine grid proposal are the Orsted, Equinor, Vineyard Wind, Eversource and Mayflower Wind.

Moreover, the group announced that the plan will benefit generally fishing vessels, which are on their way to and from fishing points, offering them about 400 feet in length boats and enough space to navigate safe.

At the moment, the US Coast Guard is making an extensive research on port access routes, estimating the need of constructing routing measures in the wind lease areas.

The Coast Guard was concerned that dissimilar array layouts may present a veritable obstacle course through which mariners must navigate. The solution jointly proposed here would address both Coast Guard issues and preserve navigation safety.

...as the consortium said.

On the other hand, Fisheries Survival Fund reported that the scallop fishing industry has its disagreements on the new grid proposal. Specifically, they argue that the project does not benefit their position at all, since scallop fishermen don't transit on east-west or north-south orientations.

We fish on contours based on depth, and we transit on geographic diagonals to and from our fishing grounds. Simply put, we were not consulted on this proposal, have not supported this proposal in the past, and do not support it now.

...Fisheries Survival Fund reported.

Concluding, the proposal attracted the business group's National Ocean Association (NOIA) attention. The Association represents offshore oil and gas and offshore renewables contractors.

The five New England offshore wind leaseholders – which include several NOIA members – are offering a viable solution to questions regarding navigational safety, fisheries considerations, distinct transit corridors and the facilitation of search and rescue operations.

... said NOIA President Erik G. Milito.

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Washwater discharge from scrubbers is safe https://safety4sea.com/washwater-discharge-from-scrubbers-is-safe/ https://safety4sea.com/washwater-discharge-from-scrubbers-is-safe/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 13:07:26 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209549 In the wake of recent criticism for the adverse consequences of the use of scrubbers, as well as several port bans on open-loop scrubbers globally, Svein Ole Strømmen, chief operating officer of Clean Marine, cited scientific data proving safety of scrubbers and argued that these systems are useful for the green future of shipping. 

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In the wake of recent criticism for the adverse consequences of the use of scrubbers, as well as several port bans on open-loop scrubbers globally, Svein Ole Strømmen, chief operating officer of Clean Marine, cited scientific data proving safety of scrubbers and argued that these systems are useful for the green future of shipping.

Criticism that washwater from marine scrubbers transfer harmful emissions from air to sea is unfounded, shows numerous independent scientific studies.

In recent months, lobbyists have managed to convince some international ports to ban open loop scrubbers because of fears that the washwater discharge from marine scrubbers are harmful to the environment, but without presenting convincing, valid scientific evidence to back up the ban.

In January this year, Ian Adams of the Clean Shipping Alliance 2020 even labelled such allegations as “fake news”.

As a company that represent technologies scientifically developed and documented, we hope that the international community and shipping industry going forward will base scientific discussions on science instead of undocumented scaremongering. The latter could prove highly detrimental to both people’s health and our planet.

 

Harmless washwater

Historically, human activity, since the beginning of the industrial revolution, has released large amounts of fossilized sulphur causing acid rain over land, lakes and rivers. Acid rain has, however, not caused any problems to the marine environment. Seawater is naturally alkaline, which gives the seawater a substantial capacity to absorb and neutralize SO2.

 This is one of the reasons why numerous independent scientific studies in recent years have all concluded that washwater from scrubbers do not harm the marine environment, including:

  • Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism’s study published in 2019 concluded that “the discharge water with chemical substances such as SOx, PAHs and heavy metals can NOT cause unacceptable effects either on the marine organisms or on the seawater quality around Japan”.
  • A three-year study led by cruise giant Carnival, and subsequently evaluated by classification society DNV GL, confirmed in 2019 that washwater samples were consistently well within the allowable IMO criteria and regulatory limits.
  • In 2019, a study by CE Delft, a research organisation in the Netherlands specialising in environmental issues, indicating that accumulated concentrations of scrubbers’ wash water components are at very low levels and well below applicable regulatory limits.
  • An Assessment of possible impacts of scrubber water discharges on the marine environment conducted by the Danish Ministry of the Environment, concluded in 2012 that “…compared to current environmental acceptability levels the releases from scrubbers can be expected to be considerably below the levels of ecological concern”.
  • As far back as 1989 and 1990, the University of Bergen in Norway conducted a benthic survey before and after the deployment of a seawater scrubber at Norway‘s Mongstad refinery, reference is made to ”A benthic survey before and after the deployment of a seawater scrubber outlet”, Botnen et.al. The survey concluded that “No evidence of harmful impact on the marine bottom fauna at the seawater scrubber outlet was found”.

Upon being presented with the results and conclusions from the recent scientific studies, several ports have confirmed that they will revoke the ban on open loop scrubbers.

 

Sulphur not a problem

However, despite the overwhelming scientific evidence, some ports are still concerned about the sulphur that the scrubber washwater release into the ocean.

Their concerns are unfounded. Firstly, all the scientific studies mentioned above prove that the sulphur emission levels from scrubber washwater do not cause any harm to the marine environment. Secondly, people need to understand that sulphur in the form of sulphate is a natural constituent of seawater and therefore not harmful to sea.

A study published by Nyman and Tokerud in 1991, illustrates the latter point by explaining: “If the sulphur in the sea were spread out as an even layer, the total ocean area of the world would be covered by a 5-foot thick (1,5 metre) layer of elementary sulphur. If all the sulphur in all the known oil and coal reserves were added to this layer, the thickness would only increase by the thickness of a sheet of paper” (see illustration).

It is also worth noting that utilising seawater scrubbing to remove sulphur-dioxide is not new. For decades, seawater scrubbing has been used to remove Sulphur-dioxide from flue gas, power stations and other industries such refineries and aluminium smelters around the globe. Please also remember that all these land-based installations have been through a detailed permitting process taking local conditions into consideration. This includes thorough evaluation of influence to the local marine environment by the discharged washwater from pH, sulphates, trace metals and PAH.

Today, seawater scrubbers are approved and in operation in numerous countries around the globe, including the UK, Spain, Norway, UAE, China, India, Taiwan, Indonesia. These local discharges does not cause negative impact on the local marine environment, but are all accepted by the local environmental agencies, who base their decisions on science and long-term surveys that prove that this is environmentally safe.

 

Sustainable stepping stone

Discharges from marine installations onboard vessels will constitute far less local stress on the marine environment because of the shear fact that the discharge is indeed moving with the vessel. There is thus nothing that indicates that a relative moderate introduction of seawater scrubbers in the marine industry will represent any significant added stress to the marine environment – locally or globally.

Finally, it is worth pointing out that scrubbers are not a “cheat option” to allow shipowners to meet the IMO 2020 regulatory requirements. Scrubbers are an important stepping stone towards transforming the shipping industry into becoming more sustainable from an environmental perspective, while also enabling shipowners to satisfy the IMO 2020 regulations.

The shipping industry needs scrubbers - and so does the environment.

 

The views presented hereabove are only those of the author and not necessarily those of  SAFETY4SEA and are for information sharing and discussion purposes only.


About Svein Ole Strømmen

Svein Ole Strømmen is chief operating officer of Clean Marine since 2014. Previously CEO of Alstom Norway and CEO of Rainower ASA. Mr. Strømmen has 30 years’ experience from design, sales and project execution of air pollution control systems, including seawater scrubbers for power stations, refineries and various industrial applications. He holds an MSc in metallurgy from The Norwegian University of Science (NTNU) and Executive Management from INSEAD.

 

 

 

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Do you know what a Bunker Delivery Note includes? https://safety4sea.com/cm-do-you-know-what-a-bunker-delivery-note-includes/ https://safety4sea.com/cm-do-you-know-what-a-bunker-delivery-note-includes/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2019 12:37:55 +0000 https://safety4sea.com/?p=21209544 A Bunker Delivery Note (BDN) is the standard document required by Annex VI of MARPOL, which contains information on fuel oil delivery. It is the responsibility of the fuel oil suppliers to provide the bunker delivery note, which must remain on the vessel, for inspection purposes, for a period of three years after the fuel has been delivered. But, what information exactly should A BDN include?

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A Bunker Delivery Note (BDN) is the standard document required by Annex VI of MARPOL, which contains information on fuel oil delivery. It is the responsibility of the fuel oil suppliers to provide the bunker delivery note, which must remain on the vessel, for inspection purposes, for a period of three years after the fuel has been delivered. But, what information exactly should A BDN include?

MARPOL Annex VI and the Protection of the Sea (Prevention of Pollution from Ships) Act 1983 mandate that specific information must be contained on the bunker delivery note, which is provided to a ship receiving bunkers. This information includes:

  • Name and IMO number of receiving ship;
  • Port;
  • Date of commencement of delivery;
  • Name, address and telephone number of marine fuel oil supplier;
  • Product name(s);
  • Quantity (metric tons);
  • Density at 15ºC (kg/m3);
  • Sulphur content (per cent m/m).

Further, the seal number of MARPOL sample label must be included in the Bunker Delivery Note for cross-reference purposes.

In addition, in the beginning of the year, on 1 January 2019, amendments to the bunker delivery note regarding the supply of marine fuel oil to ships which have fitted alternative mechanisms to address sulphur emission requirements entered into force.

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The amendments aim to address situations where the fuel oil supplied does not comply with low sulphur requirements, but has been supplied to a ship which is using an alternative compliance method to comply with the 2020 sulphur cap, such as scrubbers.

The BDN must contain a declaration, which is to be signed and certified by the fuel oil supplier’s representative. This declaration must state that the fuel oil supplied complies with regulation 18.3 of Annex VI, as well as that the sulphur content of the fuel supplied does not exceed:

  • The limit outside ECAS (currently 3.50%, falling to 0.50% from 1 January 2020) under regulation 14.1;
  • The limit in emission control areas (0.10% m/m) under regulation 14.4.

Moreover, the fuel’s sulphur content must not be more than the purchaser’s specified limit value, as completed by the fuel oil supplier’s representative and based on the purchaser’s notification that the fuel oil is intended to be used:

  • In combination with an equivalent means of compliance in accordance with regulation 4 of Annex VI;
  • Is subject to a relevant exemption for a ship to conduct trials for sulphur oxides emission reduction and control technology research in accordance with regulation 3.2 of Annex VI.

Clarifications needed over new rules

When the new regulatory text was adopted, there was a need for clarifications regarding the two specific sub-conditions of the purchaser’s specified limit value, justifying supply of high sulphur fuel oil (HSFO).

The clarification on the matter said that, as there was no tick box against the two sub-clauses, the third tick box only requires the sulphur value specified by the purchaser.

There is no requirement for validation by the supplier on the BDN as to which method of compliance is used by the ship

However, there are many who claim that the new supplier’s declaration obliges suppliers to make sure that the vessel has an approved scrubber before supplying fuel with sulphur exceeding the sulphur limit.

IBIA notes nevertheless, that this is not the case and the regulation is clear. It specifically requires bunker suppliers, if asked to provide fuel that it surpasses the sulphur limit, to do so only on the basis of receiving a notification from the buyer that the fuel is intended to be used compliantly. In fact, the supplier does not have to check if this is the case, only to obtain a ‘notification’.

Nonetheless, despite the clarifications given, IBIA states that they could prevent confusion more effectively. This can be achieved by stating the actual sulphur limits associated with each tick box, as well as a format that enables suppliers to provide assurance that they are meeting the 0.50% limit.

On the other hand, if the BDN only states that the supplier is providing fuel meeting the sulphur cap, they are only guaranteeing max 3.50% up to and including 31 December 2019.

For this reason, IBIA created and recommended a specific format to enhance clarity:

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