Loss Prevention

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Preventing wet damage on cargo

The Swedish Club highlights how to avoid wet damaged cargo. It says that heavy weather in combination with leaking hatch covers is the most common cause of wet damage on cargo. However, the main concern is the incorrectly applied and poorly maintained cargo hatch covers and sealing systems.

How to handle a vessel in rough seas

Japan P&I published a loss prevention bulletin on marine weather and the ship handling in rough seas. Navigating in rough weather conditions deserves extra attention from ship operators; Waves caused by winds and swell from several directions results to vessels experiencing a number of oscillations.

Unsafely transferring wood pellets increases the possibility of fire

Peter Hazell, Assistant Vice President, Head of FDD Skuld, focused on the various incidents concerning former coal fired power stations that have started to burn biomass as feedstock in order to enhance sustainability of fuel sources. This results to shipments of wood pellets intended to be burned. Most of these shipments are executed without incident but there are significant hazards associated with the carriage of wood pellets.

Notes on safe seafarer ship-to-ship transfer

Britannia P&I’s Loss Prevention team published an informational paper on the best way to transfer personnel from one ship to another. There’s a variety of ways to do so, but the most important thing is safety. Generally, the operations are all different as they hide different dangers, concerning the ‘product’ being transferred.

USCG completes install of Mariner Radio Activated Sound Signal

The US Coast Guard announced that it completed the installations of Mariner Radio Activated Sound Signal (MRASS) devices at 82 lighthouses across the Northeast. The purpose of updating the technology was to have a more reliable and efficient radio-controlled system.

How to effectively carry soya bean cargoes

The Standard Club informed that it has seen an increase in claims activity regarding the carriage of soya bean cargoes in the past few years. These case are especially evident in the trade of this cargo between Brazil and China. The main signs of damage related to soya bean cargo claims include discolouration of the beans, malodour and mould growth. While some cargo damage may be seen, many times the crew will not be able to fully determine the quality or condition of the soya beans.

Potential implications of proposed carriage of cargo on deck

The UK Club advises on the implications of proposed carriage of cargo on deck. Namely, carriage of cargo on deck exposes the cargo to various risks from the elements, like sea-spray and wind, as well as the potential risk of being washed off or falling overboard because of bad weather conditions or inadequate lashing/stabilising. Based on the cargo, there may also be issues with the stability of the vessel itself. 

The importance of passage planning in preventing accidents

The UK P&I Club published a statement focusing on the importance of passage planning, in light of the ‘CMA CGM Libra’, transferring cargo with a value in excess of US$500 million as well as about 8,000 tons of bunkers, grounded on a shoal whilst sailing out Xiamen port, China through a recognised dredged channel marked by lit buoys.  

What to be aware of during Asian Gypsy Moth 2019

As the West of England reports, the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) is a highly destructive forest pest that feeds on both deciduous and coniferous trees. The voracious appetite of AGM larvae (caterpillars) coupled with the ability of the female moth to travel significant distances, as much as 20 nautical miles, can cause widespread defoliation leaving trees weakened and susceptible to disease and other pests.

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