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Bunker sampling: How to assure the quality of bunkers delivered

With new, stricter regulations coming into force regarding fuels’ sulphur content, the quality of bunkers delivered to ships is of high importance; they need to meet the agreed purchase specifications and applicable global and local regulations. Nevertheless, there are cases in which ‘bad bunkers’ are delivered, which may lead to damages to ship engines, disputes between owners and charterers, even detentions and fines.

Preparing for bunkering: Proper planning & critical safety checks

The bunkering of ships, which formerly was a relatively low skill and low value activity, has deployed into a highly focused shipboard operation, due to the continuously rising oil price in conjunction with the imperative need for high marine environmental protection.

Case study: Inadequate valve opening

A bulk carrier was anchored prior delivery to a shipowner. Before delivery, the shipowner requested bunker supply to the ship, so a bunker barge got alongside on port side of vessel and started bunker supply at late afternoon hours.

Main Engine Damage due to bunkered fuel quality

A General cargo ship “M” was involved in cargo operations in an Indonesian port. Charterers had arranged the vessel to receive bunkers by a local bunker barge. The barge moored alongside of the vessel for supplying the agreed amount of 155M/T of fuel oil (180cst) into No.1 & 2 F.O. tanks respectively.

ReCAAP ISC: Numbers don’t say the full story

As the first government-to-government regional agreement against piracy, one of ReCAAP ISC’s notable achievements is sharing figures to raise awareness. But to what extent is this feedback properly accepted by the industry? Is it possible sometimes that we only look at numbers and ignore the actual meaning?

Saying goodbye to carbon: Heightened awareness or just deadline pressure?

Shipowners are already ordering compliant fuels as, January 1st, 2020, the deadline for sulphur cap approaches bringing together a great need for major changes in the ways we source, handle and use energy. However, with less than a year left, industry experts and stakeholders still argue on the hard path towards decarbonization after 2020.

How to handle electrical injuries onboard

An electrical power failure onboard not only jeopardizes vessel’s safe operations but also may be linked to electrical hazards, putting at risk crew lives, especially electricians’ who are responsible to handle these systems onboard, and also personnel attempting electrical power connections during shipbuilding, ship repair or ship breaking.

Superferry14: The world’s deadliest terrorist attack at sea

February 27th marks 15 years after the bombing of the ‘SuperFerry 14’, the deadliest terrorist attack in Philippines, which killed a total of 116 people. The blast occurred on 27 February 2004 in Manila Bay, claiming the title of the world’s deadliest terrorist attack at sea until today.

Safety Management: Why audits are important

Audits are conducted periodically either by company representatives (internal) or by third parties (external) with the aim to check SMS deficiencies and non-conformities. As non-conformity is considered an observed situation where objective evidence indicates the nonfulfillment of a specified requirement. Additionally, audits take place in case an organization requires an overview with a view to change its initiatives.

Safety Management: Why Quality is important among shipping organizations

There are numerous of questions arising concerning the term “quality”. Most of these questions are focusing on what quality is in practice and who actually defines the required items that make an organization quality compliant. Generally, quality refers to reliability, efficiency and good performance and seeks to reach all stakeholders’ satisfaction, as this is the major factor that defines the requirements on which the organization will finally focus on.

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